ObjectNumberHEXAB6101 Click on
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TitleGrave slab, PVER IVRDANVS letters, chamfered edges
ObjectNamegrave-slab | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionOn the upper face of a semi-octagonal or ridged stone, that may have covered the grave of a Norman child, is inscribed ‘PVER IVRDAN’. Each sloping side bears a cross of pattée form, accompanied on one face with an incised pattern of vertical and diagonal lines like the letters I and X united; on the other by an object which has been supposed to represent a sword. [Raine]
Broad chamfered edges with various incised motifs; on the upper a diaper pattern, a tree(?) and two small crosses, on the lower a dagger, a cross, and another motif difficult to interpret.[Ryder]
InscriptionPVER IVRDANVS
InscriptionLanguageLatin
ObjProdDatelate 11th–early 12th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodPost Anglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteFound 1790 – 1808 in the cloister. In N Transept in 1888.
DimensionsH 740 | W 260 | D 220
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 3.
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 5
ReferenceDrawings : Raine p.lxxxviii. Hodges, 1888, H Plate35. Ryder, p.123, no.29.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6102Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB6157
TitleBulbous scalloped capital, circular neck roll
ObjectNamecapital | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionCushion capital. Evidence of early Augustinian
ObjProdDatelate 11th early–12th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodRomanesque
ObjectHistoryNoteFound at the Grapes Inn 1881. First mentioned 1888. “In removing an old wall near the site of St Mary’s Church in 1880, a capital of the peculiar bulbous form (Plate 38), the prototype of the Norman cushion capital, was found. Similar capitals were found at Jarrow ….” [Hodges 1888 p.21]
DimensionsH. 0.29m × W. 0.285>0.20m × D. 0.285>0.20m. CND
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 3.
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 5
ReferenceDrawing :Hodges, 1888, p.21 & Pl.38.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6104Hover on
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TitlePortable altar
ObjectNamealtar | stonework
Materialstone
LabelTextStone 1
A portable altar used in the worship of Romano-British gods. Wilfrid used recycled stone from the Roman bridges at nearby Corbridge and Chesters and from a pagan shrine at Shorden Brae near Corbridge.
BriefDescriptionMiniature portable altar/pedestal
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNotePre-October 2014 in Recess 3 of nave N wall
DimensionsH. 0.29m × W. 0.18m at top and bottom, 0.135m in centre × D. 0.18m at top and bottom, 0.165m in centre. CND
CurrentLocNotefixed | first (top) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
Referencecf Corbridge (Phillips 1997 no.65)

ObjectNumberHEXAB6105 Click on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 12 + 5 photos
TitleCross base, spiral decoration on two faces
ObjectNamebase | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 8
A base of an Anglo-Saxon cross showing vine and scroll carvings symbolic of Christ and his Church.
This stone dates to the late 8th or early 9th century.
BriefDescriptionDecorated on three faces.
Fragmentary cross base decorated with vinescroll ornament
ObjProdDatelate 8th–early 9th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteIt was found in 1864 in the garden of Abbey Gate House (at the north side of the Priory) by the late Dr Stokoe, and was deposited in the church in 1907 by Dr C R Kendal.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 3 of nave N wall
DimensionsHeight: 31.1 cm Width: 30.7 cm Depth: 15.2 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.172 no.4]
CurrentLocNotefixed | second row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp No. 12, p181 calls it a cross base; Kirby 1974 Pl.XXIa,b,c

ObjectNumberHEXAB6107Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 18 + 1 photo
TitleHogback grave cover
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionDecorated on upper part. Three strand plait on upper ridge lower part rough because buried.
ObjProdDateLate 10th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteIt was found by the writer on April 18th, 1907. It lay on its side on the upper surface of the S. wall, it having been used as a filling stone in the core of the wall. It is the second example of this rare class of grave cover which Hexham has produced. [Savage & Hodges, 1907, p.44–45] The most northerly example in England but Scandinavian
DimensionsHeight: 38.7 cm Width: 96.2 cm Depth: 23 cm [Kirby p.175 no.32]
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 5
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 4
ReferenceCRAMP no.18 p 183. Photos : Savage Plate XXXIX. Kirby Plate XVe. Cramp Pl. 180, 969.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6108Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 20 + 2 photos
TitleIncised fish with gaping jaws decoration
ObjectNamefragment | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextA 7th century carving of a fish
This stone from Wilfrid’s church resembles work from Poitiers, France, which in the 7th century was part of Gaul. Wilfrid was heavily influenced by the church decoration he saw in Gaul and Italy.
BriefDescriptionThe head and part of the body of a fish with a broad slightly chamfered upper border. The jaws of the fish are gaping, the eye rounded. Its body is conveyed by a herring-bone effect on either side of a broad central rib. The surface is covered by a white undercoat, presumably for paint. [Cramp]
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst noticed by R Cramp in 1972.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 5 of nave N wall; previously in south aisle of chancel [CASSS 1977]
DimensionsH: 19 cm, W: 23.5 cm, D: 11.5 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.175 no.21]
CurrentLocNotefixed | at right
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/East Wall
ReferenceCramp no.20 p184–5; Kirby 1974 pl.Xc

ObjectNumberHEXAB6109Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.8
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 45 + 3 photos
TitleHogback type grave cover
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionStylized heads at either end, decorated with arcading. Shows continuity of pre-conquest grave cover forms with arcading decoration.
ObjProdDate11th–12th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodRomanesque
ObjectHistoryNote“It was found in 1831, when the grave of George Fenwick was dug in the north transept and has since been preserved in the church.” [Hodges 1888 p.50]
DimensionsL. 125.8 cm | W. 19 cm | D. 51 cm
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 7
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 3
ReferenceCramp no.45, p 242. Drawings : Raine 1865 p.lxxxviii. Hodges 1888, I Plate 42. Collingwood Fig. 19, p.91. Graham 1973 p.9, 1978 p.198. Cramp Pls. 239; 240, 1356.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6110 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB6120
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 34 + 4 photos
TitleAnimal Impost
ObjectNameimpost | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextSaxon Animal Carvings
[one of] Two important animal carvings from a decorative frieze in Wilfrid’s church, which are unique in England. There are traces of plaster on the stones which indicates they were once coloured. They tell an important story of Wilfrid’s continental tastes and his belief that the church in Northumbria should be part of the universal, ‘catholic’ church.
BriefDescriptionImpost, possibly for the column of an arch. Inset a single figure of a running animal possibly a boar, hound or wolf. The end has a lozenge in a circle.
Plaster adhering & goes with no. HEXAB6120
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned in 1919.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 7 of nave N wall
DimensionsHeight: 17.8 cm Width: 31.4 cm Depth: 14.2 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.177 no.32]
CurrentLocNotefixed | bottom left
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/East Wall
ReferenceCramp no.34, p190. Drawing: Collingwood Fig. 4 e,f p.69. Photo : Kirby Plate IXb,c. Cramp Pl. 185, 1012–15; Br Mus 110a,b.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6111Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 13 + 2 photos
TitleGrave marker with Maltese cross inscribed within circle; ‘TV’ ‘ND’ ‘VI’ ‘NI’ incised
ObjectNamegrave-marker | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 6
An Anglo-Saxon grave marker for a person called Tundwini, inscribed TV ND VI NI. This dates to the late 8th or 9th century.
BriefDescriptionRound-headed grave marker.
Inscription with TV ND VI NI. Related grave markers known from Lindisfarne & Hartlepool
InscriptionTV ND VI NI
ObjProdDate8th–9th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteMr J. P. Gibson, F.S.A., has kindly presented to the Abbey a fragment of a Saxon cross which he was able to purchase for the express purpose of restoring it to the Abbey. It is an act thoroughly characteristic of the donor, and we much appreciate the spirit and the gift, and the more so that Mr Gibson can give thought in this way when he is so seriously ill. [Par.Mag. Apr 1912 p.14]
Last year the late Mr. J. P. Gibson, F.S.A., kindly presented a stone to the Abbey which was unearthed during the building operations [excavations in Beaumont Street] at the Unionist Club. The stone is apparently a Saxon tombstone of the 8th century, and is of an unknown type. The cross is beautiful in shape and is well preserved. On each of the four arms of the cross are two letters of Saxon type, making the word TUDVINI [sic]. [Par.Mag. Jul 1912 p.8]
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 7 of nave N wall
DimensionsHeight: 22.2 cm Width: 31.6 cm Depth: 11.5 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.176 no.13]
CurrentLocNotefixed | second row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp No. 13 p181. Drawing : Hodges 1921, p.35. Photo : Kirby Plate XVd. Cramp Pl. 178, 952–3.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6113Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 31 + 2 photos
TitleFrieze fragment
ObjectNamefrieze | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionCable & dentil decoration. Like HEXAB6103
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
DimensionsH. 21 cm W. 19 cm D. 12 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.176 no.29]
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 3.
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 5
ReferenceDrawing : Collingwood Fig. 4b, p.69. Photo : Kirby Plate Xd. Cramp Pl. 184, 1001–2.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6114Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.2 | HEXAB9019.25
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 21a + 9 photos
TitlePanel with spiral decoration legs – arm – vine – grapes
ObjectNamepanel | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 2
A Romano-British stone showing men gathering vines, reused in Wilfrid’s church.
BriefDescriptionArchitectural panel decorated with vine scrolls with lower half of human figure & cockerel
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman or 7th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteThis is fragment a; fragments b and c are in the Monks’ Dormitory, Durham cathedral, catalogue nos. VIII and IX; (both bought by the Chapter Library from Joseph Fairless).
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 8 of nave N wall
DimensionsH 30.5 cm W 40.6 cm D 16.5 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.175 no.22a]
CurrentLocNotefixed | first (top) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp no.21a, page 185. Phillips no.180 page 55
Drawings : Hodges, 1888, C Plate 42. Hodges, 1921,p.111. Collingwood Fig. 2, p.67. Photo : Kirby Plate VIIb. Cramp Pl. 179, 960–2, 180, 963–8.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6115Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 47 (no image)
TitleStone with incised zig-zag
ObjectNamemoulding | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionArchitectural zig-zag and cable decoration
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman?
DimensionsL.33 cm W. 14 cm D. 15 cm [CND]
CurrentLocNoteloose | recess 3
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 5
ReferenceCramp no.47 page 251. Drawing : Collingwood Fig. 4a, p.69.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6116 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.5
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 38 + 4 photos
TitleImpost with raised interlace
ObjectNameimpost | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 9
A Viking-age cross shaft decorated with interlace, dating from 10th or 11th century.
BriefDescriptionHeavy interlace
Doorway?
ObjProdDateLate 8th–9th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound on Campy hill burial ground, north of chancel. First mentioned in 1888.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 9 of nave N wall
DimensionsH. 20.3 cm W. 31.1 cm D. 15.5 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.177 no.36]
CurrentLocNotefixed | second row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceDrawings: Hodges 1888, F Plate 42. Collingwood Fig. 4 j, k, p.69. Kirby Plate XIa. Cramp Pl. 185, 1018–21.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6117 Click on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 05 + 4 photos
TitlePart of cross shaft
ObjectNamecross-shaft | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 7
A Viking-age cross shaft with delicate interlace, dating from 10th or 11th century.
BriefDescriptionPart of cross shaft & cross head
ObjProdDate10th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteIt was found in the foundation of the apse of the Norman chancel by the late J P Gibson, FSA, on 7th May 1908.
Pre October 2014 in Recess 9 of nave north wall on a purpose built wooden stand. Previously in Recess 5 [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.67]
DimensionsHeight: 37.1 cm Width: 26 cm Depth: 14 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.173 no.6]
CurrentLocNotefixed | 2nd row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp no.5 page 178. Photos : Gibson, 1908. Kirby Plate XXIV d,e,f. Cramp Pl. 173, 918–21 Drawing : Collingwood Fig. 15, p.86.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6118Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.3
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 11 + 4 photos
TitlePart of cross head – prominent central boss
ObjectNamecross-head | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 11
Part of a cross head dating to the 11th century, decorated with a simple interlacing pattern.
BriefDescriptionCross head with part of shaft.
Crude interlace – Stafford knot.
ObjProdDateEarly 11th century
ObjectHistoryNotePossibly referred to in 1861; first clear reference in 1865.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 9 of nave N wall
DimensionsHeight: 58.4 cm Width: 30.8 cm Depth: 16.5 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.173–4 no.12]
CurrentLocNotefixed | third row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp no.11 page 180. Drawings : Raine, 1865, No. 3 p.xxxii. Hodges 1888, D Plate 42. Hodges, 1889, p.98 Collingwood Fig.17, p.88. Kirby Plate XXIV a,b. Cramp Pl. 178, 948–51.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6119Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 10 + 2 photos
TitleCross arm curved sides with raised edges
ObjectNamecross-arm | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 4
Part of the arm of an Anglo-Saxon cross. Similar crosses with incised outlines are found at Whitby and belong to the late 7th century.
BriefDescriptionCrosshead fragment with raised moulding edge
ObjProdDatelate 7th–early 8th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned in 1925.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 7 of nave N wall; earler in Recess 9.
DimensionsHeight: 19.8 cm Width: 27.6 cm Depth: 14 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.173 no.11]
CurrentLocNotefixed | first (top) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceCramp no.10 page 180. Drawings: Collingwood Fig. 18, p.89. Photos: Kirby Plate XXIII d. Cramp Pl. 178, 946–7.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6120Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB6110
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 33 + 4 photos
TitleFrieze with running cow
ObjectNamefrieze | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextSaxon Animal Carvings
[one of] Two important animal carvings from a decorative frieze in Wilfrid’s church, which are unique in England. There are traces of plaster on the stones which indicates they were once coloured. They tell an important story of Wilfrid’s continental tastes and his belief that the church in Northumbria should be part of the universal, ‘catholic’ church.
BriefDescriptionFrieze fragment with animal plaster adhering; see HEXAB6110
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound during restoration of the tower in 1966.
Pre-October 2014 in Recess 9 of nave N wall; previously in south aisle of chancel of abbey, at east end [CASSS 1977]
DimensionsHeight: 18 cm Width: 35.5 cm Depth: 29 cm [Kirby, 1974, p.177 no.31]
CurrentLocNotefixed | top left
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/East Wall
ReferenceCramp no.33 page 189. Photo : Kirby Plate IXa. Cramp Pl. 184, 1011. Points photo 133 p.128.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6122 Click on
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TitleJelly mould – from PISCINA LAVITORIUM fluted tapering base five-petal basin with central drain
ObjectNamebasin | stonework
Materialstone
LabelTextStone 12
A piscina, a bowl for washing communion vessels, from the 12th century.
BriefDescriptionPillar piscina. Multi scalloped on outside. Leaf shaped basin, five foiled with drain hole. Liturgical item from Romanesque church from which very little survives
ObjProdDatemid 12th century
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in 1907 in the foundation of the wall close to where it was placed (in Recess 11 of nave north wall) before its move to the Visitor Centre in 2014.
DimensionsH. 20.5 cm × Diam. 32 > 17 cm – CND
CurrentLocNotefixed | 3rd row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall

ObjectNumberHEXAB6124.4 Click on
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TitlePart of Dedication Stone from St Cuthbert’s Chapel
ObjectNamededication | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionStone slab with bottom-left-hand corner of inscription panel from St Cuthbert’s chapel. Creeing trough [HEXAB6142] sits on top and only “… OF | … WAS” can be seen in top right corner. The whole inscription was:
TO THE GLORY OF GOD
AND IN HONOUR OF SAINT CUTHBERT
THIS VESTIBULE WAS RESTORED 1955
Inscription
AND IN HONOUR OF
THIS VESTIBULE WAS
InscriptionInterpretationLeft-hand half of bottom two lines of inscription.
ObjProdDatec1955
NotesThe other four pieces of the inscription panel are beside the ramp in the north nave aisle.
CurrentLocNoteon ground | north side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
Reference25th August 1955. To carry out the following works in or about Hexham Abbey Church. (1) To inscribe words of dedication on the exterior east wall of the Chapel of St Cuthbert “To the Glory of God and in honour of St Cuthbert this vestibule was restored in 1955.” … Faculty Regr. no.2, p.377, no.1953.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6128 Click on
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TitleRoman altar
ObjectNamealtar | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionUpper half of Roman altar to an unknown deity.
ObjProdDate3rd cent?
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNoteFound 1887.
The late Thomas Dobson, B.A., in his “Contributions to Local History”, says, “and another large altar lies almost buried beneath the shingle of the Tyne, just below the town.” During the long drought of the present year, the author [Hodges] examined this altar, and found it to be the upper portion only, rather more than half, of a very fine one. The focus and mouldings are very perfect, but the action of the water during many centuries has removed all traces of any fine ornament or lettering. Close to it lay two other Roman stones, one being a section of a semi-circular pilaster. The three together would amount to a cart-load; and as they all lay in one spot, where the ancient ford is said to have been – and from their appearance they must have lain there for a very long time – it is presumable that the Saxon carters, in coming from Corbridge, met with a mishap in fording the river, and left the stones where they fell, as the labour of raising them would be considerable. [Hodges 1888 p.4]
On the 17th June last [1887], Mr J. P. Gibson and the author raised the altar and pilaster stone, and had them placed in the cloisters of the Abbey.
Pre-2012: against south wall of nave immediately east of former steps to south-west door, before the new slope was made during the Hexham Abbey Project.
DimensionsH. 0.85m × W. 0.72m × D. 0.45m
CurrentLocNoteloose | against wall to N of nave W door
CurrentLocationNave/West End
ReferenceHodges 1888 p4

ObjectNumberHEXAB6132 Click on
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TitleGrave cover: ☩Robert de Kirkebride☩
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourbuff
BriefDescriptionGrave slab from the Canons’ Cemetery, with a chamfered margin all round. Medium-grained buff sandstone. Incised inscription in a central panel preceded and followed by a cross: ☩ROBERT⋮DE KIRKEBRIDE☩
Inscription☩ROBERT⋮DE KIRKEBRIDE☩
ObjProdDate13th–15th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound 1830. Moved from SW corner of nave to slype in 2014 to allow construction of new access ramp.
Dimensions1.87m long, tapering from 0.43m to 0.35m; 0.15m thick
CurrentLocNoteon gound | centre of S wall
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/Slype
ReferenceCND: NF2; Ryder no.5 1995 pp 115–116. Drawings: Hodges 1888, Plate 35; Ryder 1995, 5 p.116.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6133 Click on
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OtherNumberRIB 1120 + 2 images
TitleRoman altar – Appolline Mapono
ObjectNamealtar | stonework
Materialstone
LabelTextA Roman Altar
The Romans often worshipped local gods alongside their own. This altar was dedicated to Maponos, a Celtic god of youth and love, who was often linked with Apollo, the Roman god of the sun, light and music.
BriefDescriptionDedicated to Appolline Mapono. The sides and the back have a smooth, polished feel to the stone whereas the face bearing the inscription is slightly rough. The back retains moulding at top and bottom, it has been removed from the sides and front.
Inscription
APOLLINI ·
MAPONO
Q·TERENTIVS
Q · F OVF ·
FIRMVS · SAEN
PRAEF · CASTR
LEG· VI · V · P·F
D D
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionTranslationTo Apollo Maponus … Terentius Firmus Senianus the son of … of the Oufentine tribe, prefect of the camp of the sixth legion, styled the victorious, pious and faithful, dedicates this altar
To Apollo Maponus, Quintus Terentius Firmus, son of Quintus, of the Oufentine voting-tribe from Saena,¹ Præfectus Castrorum² of Legio Sextæ³ Victrix Pia Fidelis, donated out of devotion
InscriptionInterpretationV·P·F. = Victrix Pia Fidelis
¹ Saena = An inland town of Etruria, now known as Siena.
² Præfectus Castrorum = Prefect of the Camp, the most senior position for a centurion, after which came promotion to the order of knights, perhaps with a further career as a military tribune in command of an auxiliary infantry unit.
³ Legio Sextæ = Sixth Legion.
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNoteDug up on the site of the Old Church in levelling the ground for Beaumont Street in 1864. Its capital and base have been cut down so as to make them flush with the face of the altar, and thus adapting the whole slab for use as a building stone.
Celtic God Maponus (Divine Youth) was worshipped in North Britain and Gaul. Had skills in poetry, music and hunting. The centre of his cult may have been at Lochmaben, Dumfries. [CND]
Pre-October 2014 at W end of nave. Previously (at least 1905–c1916?) in SW corner of S bay of S transept aisle, now St Etheldreda’s chapel.
DimensionsH 1.28m × W 0.52m × D 0.47m CND
CurrentLocNoteon ground | NW corner
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Monastic Workshop
ReferenceCND: NNAF2; RIB 1120

ObjectNumberHEXAB6134 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB326
TitleFragment of Roman statue of Jupiter
ObjectNamestatue | stonework
Materialstone
LabelTextRoman Sculpture
A third-century, Romano-British sculpture showing a figure draped in a toga, which might have been part of a tombstone or a decorative frieze.
BriefDescriptionRomano-British sculpture showing a figure draped in a toga
ObjProdDate2nd–3rd cent
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNoteFound 1907. A statue of a Roman god, vested in a toga, and holding in the right hand some object, was found laid in the foundation of the north wall of Wilfrid’s Church, near the west end. The portion remaining is 2ft. 8ins. high. [Savage & Hodges 1907, p.46] Mounted on a wooden backing HEXAB326 fixed to wall. Pre-October 2014 fixed to W wall of Nave N aisle.
DimensionsH 820 | W 540 | D 170
CurrentLocNoteFixed | NW corner N wall above HEXAB6133.
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Monastic Workshop
Reference181 Phillips no.12 p6. Drawing: Arch. Æl. 1965 p.320. Photo: Savage & Hodges 1907 Plate XXXVI.

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AssocObjNumberHEXAB111 | HEXAB9047
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 19 + 2 photos
TitleFragments of figural panel
ObjectNamepanel | stonework
Materialdolomite
BriefDescriptionFragments of figural panel. Made of Hartlepool or Monkwearmouth dolomite. Only pieces in Northumberland made of this material
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound March 1907 in hole, c4 ft across, about centre of nave and near west end. Built in … plaster base. Hartlepool and Roker dolomite. Broken and cut away. … However, the surface is untouched at the edges and here a gesso base for the paint survives in the grooves and on part of the lower right surface. … On the whole these pieces seem to be best reconstructed into a single panel of a Crucifixion scene. … deep and elegant style of carving with a smooth finish which was then painted … The choice of a Hartlepool and Roker dolomite … is also paralleled at Monkwearmouth … The feet are markedly polished by wear and it seems likely that at some stage the figure was venerated. This is the only known example of the occurrence of a carving in Hartlepool and Roker dolomite outside the area where it occurs naturally.
Pre-2014 in display box [HEXAB111] near west end of south wall of nave.
CurrentLocationIn storage
ReferenceCramp no.19 page 183–184; Kirby 1974 Pl.XIIId & p.180–183.
EP 184/145 (1965–1966) Correspondence with University of Keele re Saxon Stone. Includes 2 photographs and 3 drawings of stones.

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AssocObjNumberHEXAB110 | HEXAB9047
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 19 + 2 photos
TitleFragments of figural panel
ObjectNamepanel | stonework
Materialdolomite
BriefDescriptionFragments of figural panel. Made of Hartlepool or Monkwearmouth dolomite. Only pieces in Northumberland made of this material
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound March 1907 in hole, c4 ft across, about centre of nave and near west end. Built in … plaster base. Hartlepool and Roker dolomite. Broken and cut away. … However, the surface is untouched at the edges and here a gesso base for the paint survives in the grooves and on part of the lower right surface. … On the whole these pieces seem to be best reconstructed into a single panel of a Crucifixion scene. … deep and elegant style of carving with a smooth finish which was then painted … The choice of a Hartlepool and Roker dolomite … is also paralleled at Monkwearmouth … The feet are markedly polished by wear and it seems likely that at some stage the figure was venerated. This is the only known example of the occurrence of a carving in Hartlepool and Roker dolomite outside the area where it occurs naturally.
Pre-2014 in display box [HEXAB110] near west end of south wall of nave.
CurrentLocationIn storage
ReferenceCramp no.19 page 183–184; Kirby 1974 Pl.XIIIc & p.180–183.
EP 184/145 (1965–1966) Correspondence with University of Keele re Saxon Stone. Includes 2 photographs and 3 drawings of stones.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6137Hover on
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TitleTorso of priest in chasuble
ObjectNamestatue | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionMutilated statue of a priest, still showing traces of original colouring. Rare example of survival of paint in early Hexham.
The following is from Archæologia Æliana, 4th series VII, Mediæval Effigies in Northumberland, 1930, C H Hunter Blair, p.26:
XXX. In a recess in the north wall of the chancel stands a headless and armless effigy of a priest in alb and chasuble of apparently early fourteenth century date. Traces of red paint can be seen upon the chasuble.
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodMediæval
ObjectHistoryNote“In 1870 a mutilated statue of an ecclesiastic was found where the present vestry has been made (Plate 38). This could not have been a recumbent effigy, as the figure is rounded at the back, and has occupied some isolated position. Moreover, it is too large for any subordinate position at the side of a tomb or in the reredos of an altar. It is quite within the bounds of possibility that it is the very image of St Andrew which, when the Scots saw they mocked, and, knocking off his head, said “they would take it away with them that he might till his own soil.” [Hexham Abbey, Monograph by Hodges, 1888, p.39.]
DimensionsH. 1.14m × W. 0.51m × D. 0.39m. CND.
CurrentLocationNorth Transept/North End
ReferenceHodges 1888 p.39 & pl. 38

ObjectNumberHEXAB6138 Click on
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TitleMatilda’s Grave covering
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionGrave cover with shears decoration and inscription
Inscription☩⋮HIC⋮IACET⋮MATILDA⋮VXOR⋮[P]HI
LIPPI⋮MERCERARII⋮
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionTranslationHere lies Matilda wife of [P]hillip the Merchant
ObjProdDate13th–early 14th cent?
ObjectHistoryNoteDiscovery of Matilda’s Tomb. 1841, January 1. – While the sexton was digging a grave a little to the west of the north transept of the church of Hexham, within a few feet of the spot where the Saxon stycas were found, he discovered imbedded beneath the excavation, a remarkably perfect incised monumental slab, in length about 5 ft. 4 in.; breadth at the head and foot, respectively 1 foot 9in. and 1 ft. 3 in., and 6 inches in thickness. The stone, which is beautifully perfect, and may have been buried almost immediately after being laid, is inscribed “HIC JACET MATILDA UXOR HILLIPI MERCERARII.” A drawing of this beautiful relic, by Mr. Joseph Fairless, was engraved for the Table Book. The Clergymen of Hexham, at this date are, Revd William Airey, Incumbent; and Revd Charles Lee, Lecturer. The Thirty-nine Articles, Joseph Ridley, 1862, p.58.
“Attention of the Secretary had been drawn to a grave cover possibly dated 12th century to Matilda lying in the Cloister, unprotected from vandals. Undamaged cover like this with shears incised and a name were rare. In 1919 it had been in South Choir Aisle. Property Committee asked to see if a more secure place could be found.” [PCC Min. 23/11/1982 p.132 8.4]
“Site for Matilda’s grave cover to be found.” [PCC Min. 21/12/1982 p.136 8.1]
“Agreed to move Matilda stone into the Abbey.” [PCC Min. 08/03/1983 p.139 6.1]
“Matilda. Mrs Denness had written to thank all those who had helped with the removal and cleaning of this mediæval grave cover.” [PCC Min. 26/4/1983 p.154 8.7]
1984: “… it now languishes in the carrel in the north wall of the Cloister where it receives some protection from the weather but little from vandals.”
2008. The slab was removed from the floor of the south chancel aisle, sixth bay from the east, to its present position [north chancel aisle] in April.
Dimensions1.75 m long by 0.55 m wide tapering to 0.38 m, and 0.15 m thick
CurrentLocNoteon ground
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceCND: CSAF1; Ryder 1995 no.25 page 120 & 123. Drawing: Hodges 1888 Plate 35; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.76

ObjectNumberHEXAB6139 Click on
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TitleBench table fragment with Prior Leschman’s monogram
ObjectNamewindow | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionFragment of bench table with Leschman’s monogram, from below the Eastern Chapel Windows.
ObjProdDatepost 1480
DimensionsH 502 | W 1130 | D max 432
CurrentLocNoteloose | in cart hole
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceRyder p 43 1995 p126; Hodges 1888 p.35 & Pl.37

ObjectNumberHEXAB6149 Click on
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TitleTraceried head of a Perpendicular window with Leschman’s monogram.
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionBlock of tracery from a window head with a central panel bearing Prior Leschman’s monogram. According to Hodges (Plates 38 and 5(after Carter)) this window was at frist-floor level at the north end of the west range. It appears to be shown in the Buck drawing [Hodges 1888 Pl.6].
ObjProdDate14th–15th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteProbably from the Prior’s House [Hodges 1888, p.48 & plate 38] “The disposition and extent of the rooms occupied by the prior cannot now be determined, but it may be presumed that some of his apartments were in the upper story of the west range of claustral buildings, for the north gable of this range was remodelled under Prior Leschman, as shewn by the window-head from it, which is still preserved in the church (Plate 38).”
DimensionsH 0.99 | W 1.26 | D 0.31
CurrentLocNoteon display | in the barrow arch
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 2

ObjectNumberHEXAB6156 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB2099
TitleSaxon Grave Cover with Incised Chalice
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourbrown
LabelTextSaxon Grave Cover
Notice the carving of the Chalice
BriefDescriptionSemi-coped slab with incised chalice at head.
See 10th century chalice HEXAB2099.
ObjProdDate12th–13th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in March 1907 close to the north wall of the nave, in its original position, eight feet below the surface at that time. Hodges 1921 p.75
Dimensions1.176 m long, tapering from 0.44 m to 0.28 m; 0.32 m thick
CurrentLocNoteloose | north side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceRyder 1995, no 21 pp120–121

ObjectNumberHEXAB6157Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB6102
TitleCushion capital
ObjectNamecapital | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionSee no. HEXAB6102, an almost identical item
ObjProdDate11th–12th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodRomanesque
CurrentLocationExterior/Lapidarium 2

ObjectNumberHEXAB6160 Click on
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2 photos+
TitleGrave cover – John of Dalton
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionIntact tapering slab, one long side rougher than other.
Incised inscription set centrally preceded by a cross and bordered by a line on either side
Inscription☩IOHES⋮DE⋮DALTONA⋮
InscriptionTranslationJohn of Dalton
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in 1830. From the Canons’ Cemetery. In the Slype in 1888.
May not be relevant but: ‘Adam of Dalton is recorded as prior at Wetherill in 1319, 1330 and 1341’ [N Lever]
[Wetheral Priory, a house of the Benedictine Order, and dedicated to the Holy Trinity and St Constantine, was founded in 1106 from its motherhouse of St Mary’s Abbey in York.]
Dimensions1.76 m long and tapering from 0.41 m to 0.36 m, 0.20 m thick
CurrentLocNoteloose | north side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceCND: CNAF3; Drawing: Hodges 1888, Plate 35; Ryder 1995 no.4 pp 115–116

ObjectNumberHEXAB6166 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.21
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 17 + 1 photo
TitleGrave slab with full length incised cross
ObjectNamegrave-slab | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionThe slab is basically rectangular in form with outward curving long sides. The vertical faces are uncarved. Incised with a long stemmed cross, set on an extended stem and tall rectangular base.
ObjProdDate11th cent?
ObjectProductionPeriodObject date 8th–9th century – ref Bailey/Cambridge
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned 1888 as in the Slype. Found near Apse of original eastern chapel. Previously [as in CASSS] “standing against north wall of nave of abbey, at east end” [see lantern-slide HEXAB9019.21].
DimensionsL 154 cm | W 48.6 cm | D 13.4 cm
CurrentLocNoteloose | north side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceCramp no.17 p183; Drawing: Hodges 1888 Pl.35-D; Savage & Hodges 1907, Pl.XLI-D; Cramp 1984, Pl.181, 971

ObjectNumberHEXAB6167 Click on
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TitleCanon’s grave slab: Rad de Talkan Canon
ObjectNamegrave-slab | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourbrown
BriefDescriptionIntact tapering slab with a roll moulded edge. Fine-grained brown sandstone. Incised inscription running in single line down the centre of the slab, without any border.
Inscription⋮HIC IACET⋮RAD’⋮DE⋮TALKAN⋮CANOIC’⋮
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionInterpretationThe inscription presumably refers to a Ralph of Talkan. There is a contraction mark above the “OI” of the final word.
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in 1830. In the Slype in 1888.
DimensionsL 1930 | W 580 > 490 | D 180
CurrentLocNoteloose | north side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceCND: CNAF2; Ryder 1995 no.3 115–116; Hodges 1888, Plate 35

ObjectNumberHEXAB6168 Click on
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3 photos
TitleCorbel – bearded human head
ObjectNamecorbel | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 14
An 18th century carving of a man’s head.
BriefDescriptionCorbel with carving of a bearded human head
ObjProdDate18th cent
ObjectHistoryNotePre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side
DimensionsH 295 | W 330 | D 240
CurrentLocNotefixed | fourth (bottom) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall

ObjectNumberHEXAB6170 Click on
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TitleFoliated capital
ObjectNamecapital | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 10
An elaborately-decorated stone from the 13th and 14th century Priory church.
BriefDescriptionElaborately carved, foliated, capital.
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectHistoryNote“Broken capital; probably from the Refectory” [Hodges 1888 Pl.32]
Pre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side
CurrentLocNotefixed | third row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall

ObjectNumberHEXAB6188 Click on
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10 photos
TitlePlinth
ObjectNameplinth | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionSolid plinth.
ObjectHistoryNotePre-October 2014 in north chancel aisle with about a dozen carved stones on top. Pre-June 2008 it had been used as a plinth to support the effigy of Thomas of Tyndale (or Sir Thomas de Devilstone?).
DimensionsL 1473 | W 622 | H 432
CurrentLocNoteon ground
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Monastic Workshop

ObjectNumberHEXAB6191 Click on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 40 + 4 photos
TitleElaborately carved stone
ObjectNamepilaster-base | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 3
An elaborately carved Romano-British stone.
BriefDescriptionElaborately carved stone pilaster base (or impost?) with ball & rope decoration
Coarse-grained, massive yellow sandstone. Unworn. The piece seems to be trapezoidal. The ornamental zones run round all four vertical faces., and this seems to be a complete section of ornament. At the top and bottom are rows of heavy pellets, and at the centre a single cable. … Despite the fact that these mouldings may be individually found in Roman sculpture … the pellets and cables can also be found on other undoubtedly Saxon pieces. … reasonable to assume that it is a form of free-standing base. Date, last quarter of seventh to last quarter of eighth century. Cramp 1984, p.192.
ObjProdDatelate 7th–late 8th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodRomano-British
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in the garden of Hexham House; moved into the church in 1888.
Pre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side. Previously in niche in north wall of modern nave of abbey [CASSS 1977]
DimensionsH 335 | W 425 | D 195 [Kirby, 1974, p.178 no.40]
CurrentLocNotefixed | first (top) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceDrawing: Collingwood Fig. 5 s, p.71. Photo: Kirby Plate XII.b,e; Cramp Pl. 185, 1022–5.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6196 Click on
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3 photos
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 49 (Appendix B item)
TitleRomanesque grave-cover fragment
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionFragment of a Romanesque coped tegulated grave-cover with fragmentary, and possibly secondary, inscriptions on ridge. “∶SENT” and “☩EMI”.
ObjProdDate11th–12th cent
ObjectHistoryNotePre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side
DimensionsH 270 | W 410 | L 390
CurrentLocNoteloose | south side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceLongstaffe 1861, 153; Raine 1865, lxxxvii and fig.; Collingwood 1925, 90; Okasha 1971, 80, pl. 53A–B

ObjectNumberHEXAB6202Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 23 + 5 photos
TitlePart of a carved stone lintel
ObjectNamelintel | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 5
This stone is decorated with a pattern based on elaborately carved railing, and probably came from a lintel over a door in Wilfrid’s church. Similar work can be found at the contemporary monastery at Jarrow and is also copied at nearby Simonburn.
BriefDescriptionCoarse-grained, massive yellow sandstone. Broken but unworn. The only carved face is surrounded by a flat-band moulding. Within the moulding is a row of balusters which are bellying in shape, splayed, and with a single moulding at the top and bottom. Roughly dressed. Or “baluster impost” [Kirby]
ObjProdDate7th cent?
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned in 1925.
Pre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side; previously on ledge [CASSS 1977]
DimensionsH 140 | W 229 | D 101 [Kirby, 1974, p.176 no.24]
CurrentLocNotefixed | first (top) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall
ReferenceKirby 1974 Pl.XIVd

ObjectNumberHEXAB6211 Click on
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TitleCorbel – animal head
ObjectNamecorbel | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextStone 13
An 18th century carving of a monster.
BriefDescriptionCarved head of an animal – probably a lion
ObjProdDate18th cent
ObjectHistoryNotePre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side
DimensionsH 280 | W 335 | D 280
CurrentLocNotefixed | fourth (bottom) row
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Mercers’ Gallery/West Wall

ObjectNumberHEXAB6217Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.11
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 16 + 1 photo
TitleSaxon Grave Cover
ObjectNamegrave-cover | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextSaxon Grave Cover
BriefDescriptionThe stone tapers slightly towards each end and the top and bottom are rounded. The vertical faces are uncarved.
The top is carved with a long stemmed cross, and there is a section of roll moulding curving over the cross-head. The stem of the cross continuing up to the horizontal arm is roughly rounded, but towards the foot flattens and expands, with an incised outline. Sometimes referred to as Acca’s.
ObjProdDateearly 10th–mid 11th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound in May 1908 close to large stone coffin which was almost touching wall south-east of apse of Saxon church. [See lantern-slide HEXAB9019.11]
Pre-October 2014 in N chancel aisle S side.
1935: North side of western bay of south Chancel aisle [Hadcock 1935 plan & CASSS 1977]
DimensionsL 1570 | W 588 > 370 | D 115 [Kirby, 1974, p.174 no.17]
CurrentLocNoteloose | south side
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle
ReferenceKirby 1974 Pl.XVb

ObjectNumberHEXAB6219 Click on
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8 photos
AssocObjNumberHEXAB334
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 02 + 4 photos
TitleThe Spital Cross.
ObjectNamecross-shaft | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextThe Spital Cross
This carved stone is part of a decorated, eighth-century cross showing one of the earliest crucifixion scenes in Anglo-Saxon sculpture. The vine motif comes from John’s Gospel in The Bible, where Jesus speaks of being the vine and his disciples the branches.
BriefDescriptionCentral part of a cross-shaft. Crucifixion scene on one face, interlace and volutes on others. The verticals are edged with roll mouldings, with a light central groove. Decoration comparable with Italian work.
ObjProdDatemid 8th century
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned in the grounds of the Spital (St Giles’ Hospital) near Hexham, in 1861 [see photos for postcards showing it at the Spital in two different orientations]; may previously have come from Warden.
Pre-October 2014 in south transept 1st (north) bay to south of “Acca” cross in wooden support HEXAB334
“The portion of a cross shaft of the same period [as Acca’s cross] preserved at the Spital near Hexham, which is on the site of the hospital of St Giles, and now the property of Mr James J Kirsopp JP, is the finest specimen of the work of St Wilfrid’s school of artificers next to Acca’s great cross, and in size, beauty and importance must have rivalled the great crosses of Bewcastle, Ruthwell, Gosforth and Sandbach.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.74]
In 1974 or 1975 was photographed for CASSS [see link] while in the north chancel aisle, together with part of the old 1908 organ.
DimensionsH 1042 | W 330>270 | D 255>210 [Kirby, 1974, p.172 no.2]
CurrentLocNotefixed | west side
CurrentLocationVisitor Centre/Monastic Workshop
ReferencePoints photo 101 p.96; Kirby Pl.XIX
2000, 8 Feb. To send the Spital cross-shaft, of which details annexed to the petition, on loan to Italy, The Director of Civic Museums in Brescia, for an exhibition June to December 2000. Faculty Regr. no.5. Faculty no.5192.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6220 Click on
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TitleHenry of Walton’s grave slab
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourbrown
BriefDescriptionBroken sandstone grave slab bearing an incised inscription within a rectangular panel, preceded and followed by a cross:
Inscription☩HENRICUS DE WALTONA☩
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteRemoved from cloister to slype in October 1992. Discovered S of Chancel September 1830, in the slype before 1888, moved to E side of cloister c1983, hence Peter Ryder’s letter of 14/04/1987.
DimensionsH 1.68 | W 0.45 > 0.31 | D 0.19
CurrentLocNoteon ground | E end of S wall
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/Slype
ReferenceCND: S3; Ryder 1995 item 6; Hodges 1888 Plate 35

ObjectNumberHEXAB6221 Click on
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TitleRobert of Giseburn’s grave slab
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourfawn
BriefDescriptionSandstone grave slab with an incised inscription within a rectangular panel, preceded and followed by a cross:
Inscription☩ROBERT⋮DE⋮GISEBURNE☩
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteRemoved from cloister to slype in October 1992. Discovered S of Chancel September 1830, in the slype before 1888, moved to E side of cloister c1983, hence Peter Ryder’s letter of 14/04/1987.
‘Robert de Gisburn was prior at Wetherall in circa 1309 and was excommunicated in 1313’ [N Lever]
[Wetheral Priory, a house of the Benedictine Order, and dedicated to the Holy Trinity and St Constantine, was founded in 1106 from its motherhouse of St Mary’s Abbey in York.]
DimensionsH 1.67 | W 0.38 > 0.31 | D 0.19
CurrentLocNoteon ground | W end of S wall
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/Slype
ReferenceCND: S5; Ryder 1995 item 7; Hodges 1888 Plate 35

ObjectNumberHEXAB6222 Click on
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TitleWilliam Bedet’s grave slab
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
Colourbrown
BriefDescriptionSandstone grave slab possibly truncated, bearing an incised inscription between incised lines, preceded by a cross:
Inscription☩VILLEMVSBEDET
ObjProdDate12th–13th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteRemoved from cloister to slype in October 1992. Discovered S of Chancel September 1830, in the slype before 1888, moved to E side of cloister c1983, hence Peter Ryder’s letter of 14/04/1987.
DimensionsH 1.44 | W 0.53 > 0.40 | D 0.15
CurrentLocNoteon ground | W end of N wall
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/Slype
ReferenceCND: S4; Ryder 1995 item 8; Hodges 1888 Plate 35

ObjectNumberHEXAB6223 Click on
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3 photos
TitleRoman altar
ObjectNameliturgical | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionIntact Roman altar. Missing top section (focus). No inscription.
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNotePreviously (at least 1905-c1916?) in SE corner of S bay of S transept, now St Etheldreda’s chapel.
DimensionsH 1280 | W 65 | D 43
CurrentLocNoteon display
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/Slype

ObjectNumberHEXAB6234 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB375
TitleWater stoop octagonal
ObjectNamewater-stoop | stonework
Materialalabaster
BriefDescriptionOctagonal water-stoop with circular base and anti-splash inner lip
Now used as base for wooden dish [HEXAB375]
DimensionsH 76 | W across flats 158 | W max 170 | base dia 125

ObjectNumberHEXAB6250 Click on
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2 photos
TitleRoman altar fragment
ObjectNamesculptural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.64: “upper half of an altar on which a palm tree is carved in relief”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/South Wall/Bay 3

ObjectNumberHEXAB6251 Click on
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TitleRoman cornice fragment
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.64: “a length of a moulded cornice, which has both the billet and cable ornaments upon it”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/South Wall/Bay 3

ObjectNumberHEXAB6252 Click on
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TitleRoman sculptured panel
ObjectNamesculptural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.64: “a small piece of a large sculptured panel fortunately retaining a finely cut head of characteristic Roman type”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/South Wall/Bay 4

ObjectNumberHEXAB6253 Click on
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TitleRoman cornice fragment
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.64: “another part of a moulded cornice with a leaf ornament above and square billets below”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/South Wall/Bay 4

ObjectNumberHEXAB6254 Click on
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TitleRoman cornice fragment
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.64: “a very beautiful specimen from a richly carved cornice displaying birds in various attitudes associated with festoons of foliage”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/South Wall/Bay 4

ObjectNumberHEXAB6255 Click on
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3 photos
AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.6
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 28 + 2 photos (upside-down)
TitlePortion of string cornice (Roman)
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“portion of the string courses which had occupied both external and internal positions in St Wilfrid’s church”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
DimensionsH 140 | W 470 | D 213
CurrentLocNotefixed | south reveal of west door
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceHodges 1888, pl.42-G; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6256 Click on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 29 + 2 photos (upside-down)
TitlePortion of string cornice (Roman)
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“portion of the string courses which had occupied both external and internal positions in St Wilfrid’s church”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
DimensionsH 140 | W 750 | D 540
CurrentLocNotefixed | north reveal of west door
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceHodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6257Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.21
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 44 + 1 photo
TitleFragment of grave cover
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionFragment of a grave cover with part of an inscription.
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
DimensionsH 350 | W 260
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceSavage & Hodges 1907 Pl.XLI-B; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6258Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.21
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 14 + 1 photo
TitleFragment of grave cover (Pre-conquest)
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… most interesting, as it is of pre-Conquest date, and bears an irregularly sculptured cross in relief.”
ObjProdDate10th cent?
ObjectProductionPeriodPre conquest
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned by Stuart (1867)
DimensionsH 350 | W 422
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceHodges 1888, Pl.35-I; Savage & Hodges 1907 Pl.XL-B & XLI-C; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6259Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.21
TitleGrave cover with inscribed cross
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionFragment of a grave cover with an inscribed cross.
ObjProdDate14th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodMediæval
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceSavage & Hodges 1907 pl.XLI; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6260 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.21
TitleIncised part of grave cover
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescription“A remarkable 13th century grave cover with shield cross pattee and broad two-edged sword.”
“… worthy of notice, as it is the upper half of a moulded horizontal grave cover in which great prominence is given to a large double-edged sword, the pommel resting on the base of a shield on which a circular cross patée on a stem is incised.”
ObjProdDate12th–13th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodMediæval
ObjectHistoryNote1880s: in N transept
CurrentLocationNave/West End/West Wall
ReferenceSavage & Hodges 1907 Pl.XLI-E; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6261Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 43 + 1 photo (rotated 90° clockwise)
TitlePre conquest window head
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… possibly from one of the heads of an upper window of St Wilfrid’s church.”
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNote“… taken out near the top of the gable of the north transept in 1905 and is possibly from one of the heads of an upper window of St Wilfrid’s church”. [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65]
DimensionsH 220 | W 160
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceHodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6262Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 35 + 1 photo
TitleAnglo Saxon carved capital fragment
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionRelief carving of lion.
‘The Hexham lion is of a higher order of sculpture [than the Monkwearmouth lions] and has the lines of the ribs indicated. The legs and tail, the latter thrown over the back, are well drawn. It is clearly one of those “carved decorations in relief upon the stones” mentioned by Richard.’
“… part of a capital from St Wilfrid’s church, and appears to represent a lion, but the head is gone.”
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
DimensionsH 215 | w 290
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceSavage and Hodges 1907 p.41; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6263Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 37
TitleAnglo Saxon carved cornice fragment (String course)
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… part of a string course of the same date [Anglo-Saxon] with an interlaced band.”
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
DimensionsH 140 | W 400
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceSavage and Hodges 1907 p.41; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6265Hover on
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OtherNumberRIB 1169 + 1 image
TitleRoman Centurial stone of Marcius Comatus (part)
ObjectNamesculptural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionA Roman centurial stone with a rather crudely-made inscription [thanks to RIB, qv]
InscriptionCOH VIIII ? MA
RCI COMA
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionTranslationFrom the ninth cohort the century of Marcius Comatus (built this).
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNote“… found in taking down a house in the Meal Market, and was acquired by the late J. P. Gibson, F.S.A., and deposited in the church.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65]
Dimensions279 × 203
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall

ObjectNumberHEXAB6266Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.22
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 39 + 1 photo
TitleAnglo Saxon carved stone
ObjectNamesculptural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… depicts a serpent in combat with some other beast, of which only a small portion remains.”
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteFound during reconstruction of 1899–1908. “… from St Wilfrid’s church of St Andrew.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65]
1907: Lantern-slide HEXAB9019.22 shows the stone newly built into west wall of new Nave, with nothing yet to its left or above it.
DimensionsH 202 | W 223
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceSavage and Hodges 1907 p.41 pl.XL-E; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6267Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 36 + 1 photo
TitleString course
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… string-course … with interlaced work …”.
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo Saxon
ObjectHistoryNote“… from St Wilfrid’s church of St Andrew.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65]
DimensionsH 130 | W 430
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceSavage and Hodges 1907 p.41, pl.XL-D; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6268Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 27 + 1 photo
TitleString course
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescription“… string-course … with diminutive balusters in groups, alternately placed vertically and horizontally.”
ObjProdDate7th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo Saxon
ObjectHistoryNote“… from St Wilfrid’s church of St Andrew.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65]
DimensionsH 140 | W 337
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/West Wall
ReferenceSavage and Hodges 1907 p.41, pl.XL-A; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.65

ObjectNumberHEXAB6270 Click on
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TitleRoman moulded stone
ObjectNamearchitectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionHodges & Gibson 1919 p.66: “… Roman, which is the springer of a finely-moulded arch.”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 6 (West)

ObjectNumberHEXAB6274Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9019.23
TitleSculpture in bas relief re Mithras
ObjectNamesculpture | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionA portion of a large Roman stone with sculpture in bas relief representing the worship of Mithras … of very great importance, as it is a pictorial rendering of the temple dedicated to that deity, the remains of which were uncovered at Corstopitum during the excavations made in 1907.
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman
ObjectHistoryNote“Roman Sculpture. Thought to be a portion of a legionary stone. Found on site of Nave, April, 1907.” [caption for Plate XXXVII = HEXAB9019.23]
CurrentLocNotefixed | recess 2
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 5
ReferenceHodges & Gibson 1919 p.66; Savage & Hodges 1907 Pl.XXXVII

ObjectNumberHEXAB6275Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.9
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 46 (no image)
TitleRoman panel with winged victory
ObjectNamesculpture | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionA bas-relief sculpture also (mis?)described as “a piece of Saxon sculpture which represents an angel”.
“… an angel, and the raised margin of the stone shows that it is the sinister upper portion of a large panel. The subject would be the crucifixion, and have two angels in the spaces over the arms of the cross.”
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman or Saxon?
CurrentLocNotefixed | recess 4
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 4
ReferenceHodges 1888 Pl. 42K; Savage & Hodges 1907 p.42, Pl.XL-C; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.67

ObjectNumberHEXAB6276Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.1 | HEXAB9019.24
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 22 + 1 photo
TitleRosette stone panel
ObjectNamepanel | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionSurrounded by a triple moulding: the innermost is a fine roll moulding, the outer ones, which become increasingly wider, being chiselled flat. The mouldings are almost obliterated at the top and on the right side. Filling the panel is a compass-drawn rosette. The centre is built up around a grooved boss surrounded by closely packed veined petals. The thirteen outer petals are deeply scooped and divided by incised lines.
This could also be a representation of a flabellum — a fan carried in religious ceremonies.
ObjProdDatelate 7th cent?
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman or last quarter of seventh century
ObjectHistoryNoteIt is one of the panels of the stone screen which enclosed the high altar, in the sanctuary, or tribune, at the east end of the church. The marginal mouldings have been chipped off, as the stone was laid in the floor of the triforium of the south transept n the thirteenth century, and was removed and placed in its present position so that it might be seen to advantage.
DimensionsH 535 | W 638
CurrentLocNotefixed | recess 6
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 3
ReferenceHodges 1888 Pl.42B; Savage & Hodges 1907 Pl.XLIV; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.67

ObjectNumberHEXAB6277Hover on
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OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 15 + 1 photo
TitlePart of grave-marker with cross and rosettes
ObjectNamegrave-marker | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionDivided by a cross … of which the shaft is in a punch-outlined shallow relief and the horizontal arms appear to be unfinished. Within the arm-pits are four large rosettes with sunken petals. The upper two appear to have five petals, and the lower two, six.
ObjProdDatelate 9th–early 10th cent?
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst noticed by G Trayhurn and T Middlemass in April 1972, when hogback moved out of niche for photography. No record of its original discovery
DimensionsH 305 | W 254
CurrentLocNotefixed | recess 7, hidden by hogback
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 3
ReferenceKirby Pl.15c

ObjectNumberHEXAB6278 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB3043.7
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 06 + 3 images
TitleCross-shaft and part of cross-head
ObjectNamecross-shaft | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionThe head is outlined by a flat-band moulding, which encloses irregular interlace and what could be an extended animal. Below, the surviving section of the shaft is edged by a flat-band moulding with an inner roll moulding, and the face is covered by an irregular and confused interlace, which finishes with a bar terminal and does seem to include in the third unit on the right a reptilian head with a round eye.
The base of the lower cross-arm has a small panel containing one register of closed circuit half pattern F with bar terminals.
ObjProdDate10th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteFound on the site of the calefactory in 1870 by the late Canon H C Barker [Hodges & Gibson 1919].
Saxon, found in 1876 in the ruins of the Common House [Hodges 1888]. Drawn by Hodges [HEXAB3043.7].
DimensionsH 782 | W 355 > 303 | D 140
CurrentLocNotefixed | recess 10
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/North Wall/Bay 1 (East)
ReferenceHodges 1888 Pl. 42H; Savage & Hodges 1907 Pl.42; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.68

ObjectNumberHEXAB6406 Click on
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TitleIncised grave cover – Robertus de Bedelint
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionGrave cover inscribed with a canon’s name; broken at the first E of the last word
Inscription☩ROBERTUS⋮DE⋮BEDELINT&hibar;☩
ObjProdDate13th–14th cent
ObjectHistoryNoteApparently unbroken when drawn by Hodges (1888) Plate 35.
CurrentLocNoteon ground
CurrentLocationExterior/Nave/South/Cloister
ReferenceRaine, Preface II p.lxxx; Hodges, 1888 Plate 35.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6466Hover on
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TitleReset Window surmounted by an Armorial Bearing
ObjectNamesculptural/architectural | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionAn elaborate window with an original hood mould with cusps. A water table below the sill lies over a panel with foliage and animal heads to either side. The arms are those of Prior Leschman.
ObjProdDate15th cent
ObjectHistoryNote1888. In Buck’s [July 1728] drawing we see that the archway has been remodelled, probably at the beginning of the seventeenth century. Above the archway is a two-light window, and above this, lighting what appears to have been the principal room in the tower, are three windows. The centre one is an oriel or niche of rich character, having a crocketted canopy and carved finial; while beneath it is a shield, bearing the monogram of Prior Rowland Leschman (1480–1491), which dates the work. This oriel remains in a mutilated condition, and is built into the modern wall at his place, but facing the court. [The Abbey of St Andrew, Hexham, A Monograph, C C Hodges, 1888, p.47 & Pl.6]
1907. The Prior’s House […] occupied the whole length of the west [sic – north] side of the prior’s court, and was two storeys in height. In the centre was a passage to the court and this was vaulted in two bays, and had fine archways at either end and above that to the north was the elaborately ornamented window in which a shield with Prior Leschman’s rebus [sic – monogram] is still seen. The stones forming this window were saved after the fire, and built into the south wall facing the court, but in 1907 were taken out and placed in the north wall. [Hexham and its Abbey. Hodges & Gibson, 1919, p.102/103]
CurrentLocNotefixed | over N arch
CurrentLocationExterior/Prior’s Court

ObjectNumberHEXAB6500 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9158.4 | HEXAB5223.1 | HEXAB3191
OtherNumberRIB 1172 + 2 images
TitleFlavinus
ObjectNamestele | memorial
Materialsandstone
LabelTextA Memorial to a Roman Standard Bearer 1st Century
The Flavinus tombstone, discovered in the foundations of the south transept in 1881, is a significant historical artefact.
The inscription reads:
DIS MANIBUS FLAVINUS EQ(ues) ALAE PETR(ianae) SIGNIFER
TVR(ma) CANDIDI AN(norum) XXV STIP(endiorum) VII H(ic) S(itus est)
To the spirits of the departed, Flavinus, trooper of the cavalry
regiment Petriana standard bearer of the troop Candidus, aged
25, of seven years’ service, he lies here.
The scene carved on the stone represents a mounted soldier riding over a prostrate barbarian. The soldier is wearing a helmet with a high crest and plume; round his neck is a torque, which indicates his high rank. He is carrying a standard, which displays the sun god in a circle. The barbarian, by contrast, is naked and carries a large oval shield and a short, leaf-
shaped sword.
How the stone ended up here at the Abbey is a mystery, but re-use of original Roman stone was common across Europe. The 7th Century Crypt of St Wilfrid’s original church was constructed with some Roman stone, take a look to see if you can see some original inscriptions on the walls.
[previous]
Memorial to a Roman Standard Bearer
1st Century
Inscription
DIS MANIBUS FLAVINUS EQ[ues] ALAE PETR[ianiae] SIGNIFER
TVR[ma] CANDIDI AN[norum] XXV STIP[endiorum] VII H[ic]
S[itus est]
Translation
To the Venerated Departed: Here Lies Flavinus, a Horse
Soldier of the Cavalry Regiment of Petriana, Standard
Bearer of the Troop of Candidus, Aged 25, of 7 Years’
Service.
BriefDescriptionThe Flavinus memorial slab … the large Roman funeral slab in the blocked doorway of the south transept.
… The slab is the largest of its class that has been found in England. It is a stock design used largely all over the Roman Empire, and represents a mounted soldier riding over a prostrate barbarian. … The soldier is well armed, he wears a helmet with high crest and plume, and round his neck is a torque, which indicates his high rank. In his right hand he carries the standard, which displays the sun god in a circle. The long sword is sheathed, and no other weapon is seen. The horse is amply harnessed, furnished with martingales, covered with a square-cut saddle-cloth, and shod. The barbarian is naked, and carries a large oval shield by a strap with his left arm, while his right hand grasps a short leaf-shaped sword of strikingly different form to that worn by his conqueror. [Hexham and Its Abbey, Hodges and Gibson, 1919, p.72]
Inscription
DIS MANIBVS FLAVINVS
EQ ALAE PETR SIGNIFER
TVR CANDIDI AN XXV
STIP VII H S
InscriptionContent DIS MANIBUS FLAVINUS
EQ[ues] ALAE PETR[ianæ] SIGNIFER
TVR[ma] CANDIDI AN[norum] XXV
STIP[endiorum] VII H[ic] S[itus] [est]
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionTranslation To the Venerated Departed: Here Lies Flavinus
A Horse Rider of the Cavalry Regiment of Petriana
Standard Bearer of the Troop of Candidus
Aged 25, of 7 Years’ Service
InscriptionInterpretationEques = Horseman. Ala = Cavalry Regiment. Signifer = Standard Bearer. Turma = Cavalry Unit of 30 horsemen.
“The general style of the sculpture, together with the fact that the inscription contains a single ligature (IN in Plavinus), lead us to suppose that the slab belongs to the second century.” [Dr Bruce in Archæologia Æliana, vol. ix., pp. 164–166]
ObjProdDate1st–2nd cent
ObjectHistoryNoteThis was found beneath the floor of the slype in September 1881, in one of the remaining foundation walls of St Wilfrid’s Church. It was raised and fixed at the expense of the churchwardens.
In 1881 the author [CC Hodges] obtained permission to explore beneath the floor at the south end of the south transept with a view to verifying a story, which had gained some credence, that a large hollow vault existed there. On Monday, September 19, operations were begun, and the same night, while digging in company with Mr Robert Robson, the parish clerk, he came upon a foundation of ancient date running across the slype. Laid in this foundation was the large slab, shown in the position in which it lay on Plate 8, and in detail on Plate 42. [E, Plate 8 shows it face upwards on a foundation wall aligned n. to s., with its base under the south wall of the slype]. It was raised at the expense of the Rector and Churchwardens, and is now placed in an upright position in the south transept. It was thus described by Dr Bruce in a paper [Archæologia Æliana, vol. ix., pp. 164–166], read before the Society of Antiquaries of Newcastle-upon-Tyne, October 26, 1881:—
“The slab was lying with its face upwards, and covered with mortar, about two feet below the floor. It had been used in laying the foundation of a wall three feet five inches thick, which crossed the chamber at a distance of seven feet from the west wall of the transept. The larger portion of the stone projected beyond the wall, and being insufficiently supported, had snapped across at the point of junction. The slab is about nine feet long and three feet and a half wide; it averages one foot in thickness, and is supposed to weigh about two tons. The local masons say the stone is that of a neighbouring quarry—that of Birkey Burn. On lifting the stone, an operation which was not effected without difficulty, it was found to be elaborately carved on the upper side. The carving represents a cavalry officer riding rough-shod over a fallen foe. The officer has his side face towards the spectator. On his head is a helmet which is adorned with two flowing plumes; there has doubtless been a third, which is hid from view by the larger of the two that are represented. There is a torque round his neck. He holds a shield in his left hand; in his right he carries a standard, at the head of which is a radiated figure exhibiting, on close inspection, something like the appearance of a human head. It may be a mere ornament; or if it be a head it may be that of the Emperor or Apollo. The horseman has on a coat of mail, and by his right side hangs his sword. The horse as usual is small in comparison with the size of the man, the bridle and trappings are shown, but no stirrups are seen. The prostrate foe is crouching on the ground; his face fronts the spectator, and is well seen; he wears a beard, which the rider does not; his sword is in his right hand and is uplifted, but that part of the carving which should represent the end of it is broken off. On each side of the slab has been an ornamented column terminating in an elaborate capital, considerable portions of which remain. The upper part has been carefully decorated, but the efforts of the Roman artist have been to a great extent obliterated by the pickaxes of more recent workmen. The carving on the whole is well designed, and is very effective; it has not however been so well finished as some other Roman works of art which have been found in the north. The stone bears an inscription, which shows that it has been a tombstone erected to the memory of a deceased soldier. The lower part of the stone is untouched with the chisel, inducing the belief that this part had been let into the ground; the back and sides of it, too, are rough, rendering it probable that it has been inserted into a wall. It may have formed the front of a cippus in which were deposited the ashes of the young man.”
DimensionsH 2642 | W 940 | D 290
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/West Wall
ReferenceCND: STWW1; Hodges 1888 p.4 pl.42-A
URLSee also: www.hexhamabbey.org.uk

ObjectNumberHEXAB6501 Click on
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OtherNumberRIB 1122 + 2 images
TitlePart of Altar to Maponus Apollo
ObjectNamealtar | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionAltar cut to form a rounded arch-head at west end of roof of northern passage.
Inscription speculatively reconstructed …
Inscription… APO …
… APO …
… P . AE …
… VS …
………
InscriptionContent[Deo]
[M]apo[no]
Apo[llini]
P(ublius) Æ[lius]
lus c(enturio) [leg(ionis) VI]
[V]ic(tricis) u(otum) [s(oluit) l(ibens) m(erito)]
InscriptionLanguageLatin
InscriptionTranslationTo the god Maponus Apollo, Publius Ælius … , centurion of the Sixth Legion Victrix, willingly and deservedly fulfilled his vow
InscriptionDescriptionFragments of five lines, which have been so injured by insertion in its present position as to be unintelligible. [Raine II 1865 p.xxxvii]
ObjProdDatec208
ObjectHistoryNoteFirst mentioned 1732. “The only other inscription now visible in the crypt is on a slab which has been used as a doorhead in the north passage; only a few letters are exposed, from which it appears to be a dedication to Apollo Maponus.” [Hodges 1888 p.3]
Celtic God Maponus (Divine Youth) was worshipped in North Britain and Gaul. Had skills in poetry, music and hunting. The centre of his cult may have been at Lochmaben, Dumfries. [CND]
DimensionsH 965 | W 533
CurrentLocNotefixed | west end of roof of northern passage
CurrentLocationNave/Central Aisle/Crypt
ReferenceHodges 1888 Pl.39-B

ObjectNumberHEXAB6502 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9158.2 | HEXAB3028
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 41 + 5 photos
TitleThe Frith Stool
ObjectNameliturgical | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelTextOn the floor you see the 7th-century Frith Stool or bishop’s throne, its back towards you.
Underneath this is the apse of the east end of a Saxon building.
This may have been a small chapel built in line with the larger church.
BriefDescriptionOf the furniture of St Wilfrid’s church, the only portion which has survived to our own time is the stone chair known as the “frith stool.” In all probability this is the veritable bishop’s stool, the cathedra of the Saxon
church. As Hexham was not made a See until some years after the church had been built, the “frith stool” is probably an introduction of the time when Wilfrid sat as Bishop of Hexham. On the other hand it may be argued, that as St Wilfrid obtained for his church the privilege of sanctuary, in connection with which the “frith stool” was used, it was made for that purpose. It was so used during the Middle Ages, and probably from the time when Hexham ceased to be the seat of a bishopric. The stool is cut from a single block of stone, and was mounted on another stone. At a later period a moulding was added beneath the block forming the seat; this moulding has now been destroyed and the seat is mounted on a base built up of several stones. The drawings on Plate 35 sufficiently illustrate this curious relic. The distinctly classical feeling of the design will be observed, and this favours the opinion held by the Reverend G P Browne that it was modelled after some similar chair in Rome, which St Wilfrid had seen. It is worthy of remark that the triquetra knots in the ornamentation of the arms are not joined to the twisted bands, but are quite independent of them. The appearance of the back, and of one side, is such as to lead us to suppose that the stool was originally placed in an angle, and that these two faces were against adjacent walls.
ObjProdDate7th cent?
ObjectProductionPeriodAnglo-Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteThe “frith stool” has had a chequered history, and has been frequently moved. At the close of the last [18th] century it was placed in front of the first column from the east on the north side of the choir. It is shown in this position on the plate, and there can be little doubt that this was the place it occupied during the Middle Ages, for we are told by Prior Richard that it stood “against the altar”. When the choir was re-pewed in 1830 the “frith stool” was moved and placed in the north aisle behind Prior Leschman’s chantry. It remained there till 1859, when all the ancient arrangements of the chancel were destroyed. It was then moved and placed in the aisle of the south transept [north end]. On this occasion the moulding under the seat was destroyed, and the seat was broken into two pieces. Carelessness and total indifference to the value of the ancient remains, was one of the most conspicuous features of that terribly destructive movement. In 1872 the “frith stool” was restored to its ancient position in the choir, but was not long allowed to remain in peace, for in 1885 it was again moved, and placed on the south side of the communion table, with its back against the east wall, a position to which it is quite unsuited, and where it is not seen to advantage. It is greatly to be desired that this valuable and unique relic of past days be once more placed in its ancient position, and be there allowed to remain. [Hodges 1888 p21]
‘The “Frith Stool” in which St Wilfrid sat is now fittingly placed on the north side of the sanctuary, and was, to the delight of us all, most fittingly occupied on Saturday by the venerable Archbishop of York, Wilfrid’s true successor.’ [The Church Times 14/08/1908 p190]
“The Frith Stool now stands [centre of Choir] where it stood in the year 674. It looks most dignified. It is now visible to every visitor of the Abbey. It is, of course, the most deeply interesting piece of furniture that we possess. It may well be the envy of continents and countries.” [Par Mag Sep 1909 p50]
“By seizing anyone flying for refuge, within the four crosses on the outside of the town, a penalty of £16 was incurred; within the town, the penalty was £32; within the walls of the Churchyard, £48; within the doors of the Choir, £144; and besides these penalties, penances as for sacrilege, for each offence; but they who shall presume to seize anyone in the Stone Chair near the Altar, called the Frid Stool, for such flagitious crime, shall not be allowed to purchase remission by any sum of money, but shall be bootless, incapable of pardon.” — Prior Richard.
DimensionsH 590 | W 800 | D 545
CurrentLocationChancel/Choir
ReferenceHodges 1888 pl.35; Savage and Hodges 1907 pp.54–5 + fig. on p.vii
HAR: fn.14 p.74
1907. 21st day of November. … 10. The replacing of the ancient Frith Stool on the north side of the re-arranged choir in front of the restored Leschman Chantry. … Faculty Regr. no.1. Faculty no.316. NRO EP.184/80. Hex. Parish Mag. Dec. 1907, p.91.
1909. 21st day of July. … To remove [from outside the Leschman Chantry] the Frith Stool to the place above the site of the Saxon apse. Faculty Regr. no.1. Faculty no.356. NRO EP.184/80.
URLSee also: www.hexhamabbey.org.uk

ObjectNumberHEXAB6503 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9158.8
OtherNumberCASSS Hexham 01 + 14 photos
TitleBishop Acca’s Cross
ObjectNamefunerary | stonework
Materialsandstone
LabelText[pre-2014]
SAINT ACCA’S CROSS
Bishop of Hexham 709–732
The larger cross is thought to have stood at the head and the
smaller, which bears a crucifixion scene, at the foot of the
grave of St Acca.
[post-2014]
SAINT ACCA’S CROSS
Bishop of Hexham 709 – 732
The tall highly decorated stone was thought to have stood at the foot
of St Acca’s grave. A smaller stone, often also associated with the
grave, is now in the Exhibition Centre in the former Priory building.
BriefDescriptionBishop Acca’s Cross re-assembled from fragments. It stands on a stepped plinth; the west face of the top step has an inscription.
Inscription
THE CROSS
WHICH STOOD AT THE HEAD OF THE GRAVE OF
ACCA
BISHOP OF HEXHAM
A.D. 709 – 732. WHO DIED A.D. 740.
ObjProdDate8th cent
ObjectHistoryNote1935: “The Rector (J V C Farquhar) prevailed upon the Dean (Dr C A Alington) and Chapter of Durham to return the Acca Cross which had been at Durham in the Chapter Library since 1870. The site for its erection in the South Transept was approved by Sir Eric Maclagan and Sir Charles Pears. A replica of the cross was presented to the Dean & Chapter of Durham.” [EP 184/274: Parish of Hexham Inventory 1932 et seq, copy on HEXAB9516.2]
In 1936 returned to the Abbey from the Cathedral Library, Durham; it had been taken there in the 1870s and repaired.
“The greater part of the cross from the head of Acca’s grave in four pieces, and many other relics of the same period have been taken from Hexham, and are now preserved in the Cathedral Library, Durham. These are all fully described and illustrated in a valuable work by Professor Haverfield and the late Canon Greenwell. A replica of Acca’s cross was erected, by public subscription, and placed in the cemetery at Hexham, to the memory of the late Isaac Baty, in 1894. It was designed by C C Hodges.” [Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.73]
“… the portions of one of the crosses which have been found. The first of these was brought to light in 1858, when the eastern chapels were removed. Another, the largest piece, did duty as the lintel of a doorway at Dilston, and was given by the Commissioners of Greenwich Hospital to the Cathedral Library at Durham. The collection of early carved stones made by Mr Fairless passed into the possession of the Dean and Chapter of Durham about 1870. In 1874 two more fragments of the same cross, which fitted to one another, were found in an old building adjoining St Mary’s Chare. These were purchased by the Rev. Canon Greenwell, and deposited along with the other pieces in the Cathedral Library, Durham. Recent investigations have shewn that these four stones are all portions of the same cross, on one side of which was a long inscription. Only a few words can be read with certainty, but there can be little doubt that the initial word is ACCA.” [Hodges 1888 p.50]
DimensionsH 3580 | W max 373 | D max 240
CurrentLocationSouth Transept/East Aisle/Bay 1
ReferenceHodges 1888 p.50; Hodges & Gibson 1919 p.73 + plate facing p.72;
EP 184/123 (1935–1936) Papers mainly correspondence re Acca’s Cross. Includes printed leaflet, St Acca, Bishop of Hexham and plan of Abbey dating various parts of the structure, n.d.
1936. St Acca’s Cross. On the 21st day of April 1936. To place the shaft of St Acca’s Cross at present in the Chapter Library at Durham, within the Priory Church of Hexham aforesaid under the arch opening from the South Transept to the northern of the two eastern Chapels in the Transept. The Cross Shaft to be set on two base stones; and to provide electric light so that the East face of the cross (which might not always be clearly seen) can be well shown when desired. Faculty Regr. no.1, p.65, no.1300. NRO EP.184/80.
‘Hexham Cemetery’ pp.10,31.
URLSee also: www.hexhamabbey.org.uk

ObjectNumberHEXAB6504 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB102 | HEXAB103
TitleThe Font
ObjectNameliturgical | stonework
Materialstone
LabelTextFont
The Fount of Faith
The font holds the water used in baptism (also called christening).
Baptism is the entry into Christian life which is why the font is near the entrance to the church.
In the baptism service all who are baptized join “the company of Christ’s pilgrim people”.
Jesus Christ said to his followers: “Go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.” [Matt. 28:19]
The ancient font stands on a 12th-century pillar. There is an 18th-century cover and a tall canopy made in 1916 which includes many mediæval fragments.
BriefDescriptionThe Font, like the Abbey itself, is an assembly of parts from different eras. The ancient bowl, a great drum of dressed stone, may have Roman origins and could be that used in Wilfrid’s church. It stands on a pedestal of alternating attached colonnettes and panels of ‘dog-tooth’ decoration. This occurs elsewhere in the Abbey and is typical of Early English Gothic carving around 1200. [H Dixon, “Hexham Abbey Revealed” (201) p.52]
It is made up of two parts, the stem and the bowl, which no doubt belong to widely-separated periods. The bowl is of circular form, of great size, plain, and massive. Its only decoration is a semi-circular moulding or band round the upper portion. Its general appearance, and the manner in which the stone has been dressed, give some colour to the supposition that it is of pre-conquest date, and that in the thirteenth century it was mounted on a stem ornamented with four engaged shafts, between which the dog-tooth flower is worked. [Hodges 1888 p.45]
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman, Saxon, mediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteFont locations:–
Pre-Dissolution. S bay of N. transept aisle. [Hodges 1888 Pl.8]
1795. Choir, NW corner, against the angle of stalls. [Hexham Abbey Record, 674 to 1907, Savage & Hodges, 1907, Carter’s plan on Plate V]
1855. South transept, side aisle (formerly in the choir). [Directory of Northumberland, Whellan. 1855, p.833]
1870. In bay to w. of crossing. [Hodges, Monograph 1888, Plate 8]
1907. Proposed: Nave, immediately west of the western pier of the arcade – (not implemented). [Hexham Abbey Record, 674 to 1907, Savage & Hodges, 1907, Plate XXVIII]
1907–1916 In the south bay of the south transept aisle. [Hexham Priory, C.C.Hodges, 1913, p.8 plan]
When he moved the font Cuthbert James Herdman put under it a bottle containing his name and those of his son, George Edward Herdman (my father), and that of a labourer. [Pers. mems. of a grandaughter, Mrs Joyce Stockdale, 21 Nov. 2002 – CND]
“Proposed by Mr Harrison, seconded by Mr Walker, and unanimously agreed:— That the Abbey Font be completed with steps and ancient tabernacle cover (pendant) and be placed with ancient kneeling boards at the west end of the Nave as advised by Mr Temple Moore and Mr C C Hodges, and that an appeal be made by the Rector to defray the cost of the same at or about the sum of two hundred pounds; and that application for faculty be made.” [Churchwardens’ Minutes 04/11/1915]
DimensionsH c960 | Dia max c1000
CurrentLocNoteon ground
CurrentLocationNave/West End
Reference1916. Faculty: 1. To remove the Font to the West end of the Nave. Faculty Regr. no.1. Faculty no.520, 13.4.1916. NRO EP.184/80.

ObjectNumberHEXAB6504.1
AssocObjNumberHEXAB102 | HEXAB103
TitleThe Font: Bowl
ObjectNameliturgical | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionThe bowl is of circular form, of great size, plain, and massive. Its only decoration is a semi-circular moulding or band round the upper portion. Its general appearance, and the manner in which the stone has been dressed, give some colour to the supposition that it is of pre-conquest date
ObjectProductionPeriodRoman, Saxon
ObjectHistoryNoteQuarried A.D. 78 – in the time of the Apostles. Probably the pedestal of a Roman Statue. Utilized by St Wilfrid for his Cathedral as a Christian Font A.D. 674, and so used to 1915. Of abnormal size.
DimensionsExt H c430 × Dia max c1000 | Int H c350 × Dia c690
CurrentLocationNave/West End

ObjectNumberHEXAB6504.2
AssocObjNumberHEXAB102 | HEXAB103
TitleThe Font: Pedestal
ObjectNameliturgical | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionIn the thirteenth century [the bowl] was mounted on a stem ornamented with four engaged shafts, between which the dog-tooth flower is worked.
ObjProdDate13th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteThirteenth Century, and same date as Transepts
Pre-1916 mounted on a circular plinth. From 1916 mounted on a three-step octagonal plinth with steps to a platform on the west side.
DimensionsH 530 | W 560 × 560
CurrentLocationNave/West End

ObjectNumberHEXAB6505 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9001
TitleTree of Life
ObjectNametomb | stonework
Materialsandstone
BriefDescriptionTree of Life altar tomb, beneath an arched canopy.
Incised design of a cross with a naturalistic vine leaf forming each arm, surrounded by a regular pattern of vine leaves and fruit. At the base the cross shaft divides and issues from the mouths of a pair of grotesque heads, one with either pointed ears or horns.
It is a beautiful example, and of very unusual character, and consists of a basement built across between the angle of the choir and north transept aisles, and the base of the adjoining pier in the north transept. Upon this basement lies a massive slab of hard freestone, which bears an incised design of great intricacy. This is spanned by a low segmental arch, richly moulded. The jamb mouldings are furnished with bases. Four images, which stood on brackets and were protected by canopies, flanked the arch, two on either side of the tomb. The wall is finished with a coping in two slopes; the upper one is returned in the centre and formed into small gables. These have unfortunately been destroyed. The image brackets and canopies have also been a good deal injured; otherwise, the tomb is in remarkably good preservation. There is nothing upon this tomb to indicate in whose memory it was erected, but “tradition, always ready to account for everything,” has assigned it to Ælfwald, king of Northumbria, who was murdered in the vicinity of, and is known to have been buried in, the church at Hexham in 788. There appear to be no other grounds for the appropriation than that this is the only tomb in the church which is befitting a royal personage. It is, of course, long posterior to the time of Ælfwald, and was probably erected shortly before 1290. [Hexham Abbey, Monograph by C C Hodges, 1888, p.51]
ObjProdDate13th cent
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
DimensionsL 2070 | W 630
CurrentLocNoteat W end, i.e. S end of N Transept aisle
CurrentLocationChancel/North Aisle

ObjectNumberHEXAB6506.1 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB213
TitleStatue of St Christopher, Pilgrim, or Constable
ObjectNamesculpture | stonework
Materialstone
BriefDescriptionAt the west end of this side was a narrow doorway, the western jamb of which was formed by a stone figure, representing a pilgrim holding a staff. The wretched manner in which the figure is sculptured has given rise to many absurd theories concerning it, which it is needless to repeat. The bands round the ancles are worthy of remark. They occur, in a similar manner, on a sculptured figure of a pilgrim in Lincoln Cathedral, where they are seen to be for the purpose of keeping on the boots by tying the upper leathers round the ancles. [Hexham Abbey, Monograph by C C Hodges, 1888, p.52]
A rudely carved figure of St Christopher, forming the jamb of the doorway, stands at the south-west corner. This is … clothed in a long loose gown buttoned down the front and falling open below the knees. The hose are folded around the ankles and the feet are bare. The head is covered by a hood falling upon the shoulders and a stout staff is held by both hands diagonally across the body. Upon the head are remains of carving which probably represent part of the robe of the child Christ whose figure is now destroyed. [C H Hunter Blair, Arch.Æl. Ser.IV vol.7 p.123–4]
ObjectProductionPeriodmediæval
ObjectHistoryNoteBetween c1860 and 1908, when the Leschman chantry [HEXAB213] stood in the north bay of the South Transept aisle with its present east end open and facing west, the statue stood in the opening.
DimensionsH 1370 | base W 370 (N–S) | D 400 (E–W)
CurrentLocNoteon ground W of Leschman Chantry
CurrentLocationChancel/Presbytery