ObjectNumberHEXAB5019.60Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB202
TitleAbbey News & Views
ObjectNameserial | publication
ContentDescriptioncover photo. in colour of Muriel Woodhead & Icons for sale at Abbey Christmas fair
p7 Remembrances of 2005 by John Loader
p10–11 The danse macabre panels at Hexham Abbey by Dr Sophie Oosterwijk. [HEXAB202.8–.11]
p11 New handbells for Hexham Abbey
p14 Christmas Fair
p15–18 staff news Welcome to new verger John Arthur + B&W photo. Good-bye to Julia, our verger + B&W photo.
p18 Dagmar on the move. & new mission project 4year support of Anglican mission agency USPG in Brazil + B&W photo. of Ruth & Saulo de Barros.
p18 Obituary Revd Norman Hill, Priest by Graham Usher
Dimensions148 × 210
PubDateJan 2006
TypeParish Magazine
Edition60
PublisherHexham Abbey
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNotestapled
CurrentLocationIn storage

ObjectNumberHEXAB5100
TitleHexham Abbey project – Architects plans & reports
ObjectNameplan | ephemera
Materialpaper
BriefDescriptionHexham Abbey project — Architects plans (mostly size A1) & reports, PMT (Purcell Miller Tritton, York)
mixture of plans, drawings, photographs. Design reports; in Viking box
ObjProdDateNov 2011–Jan 2012
CurrentLocationIn storage
ReferenceHAR: Fig.14 p.19, fn.14 p.20

ObjectNumberHEXAB5157Hover on
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TitleHieroglyphick Bible
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelTextA CURIOUS HIEROGLYPHIC BIBLE
or ‘Select Passages in the Old and New Testaments, represented by Emblematical Figures, for the Amusement of Youth.’
Published by Thomas Hodgson (London)
The date of the first edition is not known because no copy has been found. The second to twentieth editions appeared between 1784 and 1812.
These later editions, of which this is probably one, are essentially reprints of the 1784 version with some additions.
The current view is that the likely author is Thomas’s Bewick’s brilliant but short-lived younger brother John (1760–1795). He was noted as an engraver so accomplished that his apprenticeship (with his brother and Ralph Beilby) was concluded early. He then went to London where he worked, amongst other publishers, for Thomas Hodgson who was responsible for this volume.
This particular volume was kindly donated in 2016 by a Mr. Gilbertson in memory of his parents.
HEXAB5157
CreditLineKindly donated in 2016 by a Mr Gilbertson in memory of his parents.
ContentDescriptionTitle page: “A Curious Hieroglyphick Bible; or, Select Passages in the Old and New Testaments, represented with Emblematical Figures, for the Amusement of Youth: designed chiefly To familiarize tender Age, in a pleaſing and diverting Manner, with Early Ideas of the Holy Scriptures. to which are subjoined, A ſhort Account of the Lives of the Evangelists, and other Pieces, illuſtrated with Cuts.”
“with the Addition of many remarkable Parts of Scripture, and other great Improvements”
Pages 1–130 are intact, though 1–9 and 129–130 are damaged with losses at the outer edges. Page 1 had Psalm XC [90]; pages 128, 129, 130 have engravings of the Evangelists, St Matthew, St Mark, and St Luke who looks over his shoulder in surprise to see St John has been torn away.
ObjProdDatec1800
ObjectHistoryNote“Printed for T. Hodgson, in George’s-Court, St. John’s-Lane, Clerkenwell. [Price One Shilling bound.] Entered at Stationers-Hall agreeable to Act of Parliament.”
No endpapers survive except perhaps a torn slice at the back. Both boards have inscriptions but these are difficult to read, partly because they are poorly written and partly, apparently, because earlier inscriptions have been crossed out or erased (or scraped?) to make way for later ones to the disadvantage of both. Patience might produce more but the front board writing, all in ink, seems to include ‘1872 | Mary Ann Bell’; and the back board, mostly in ink, has in pencil at the foot ‘Mary Thom [as??] | Book’.
Dimensions80 × 130
PubDatec1800
Paginationc130
PublisherThomas Hodgson
PubPlaceLondon
BindingNoteFront and back boards, full calf, are detached. The spine, also calf of course, is heroically intact and firmly sewn to the page block.
AuthorJohn Bewick
CurrentLocationNave/North Aisle/Case 2 (North)

ObjectNumberHEXAB5215.1Hover on
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TitleHexham Abbey Revealed: Discoveries of the Hexham Abbey Project 2009 – 2017.
ObjectNamebook | publication
ContentDescriptionContents; List of 64 figures (colour and B&W); Preface; Foreword by The Rt Revd Graham Usher, Bishop of Dudley; 9 chapters:
1. Conservation Aspects of the Abbey Project – Tom Kelsey
2. What if? 150 Years of Proposed Extensions to the Abbey – Chris Britton
3. The Adaptation of the Priory Buildings – Chris Cotton
4. Discoveries in the Abbey House during the 2013/4 Works – Peter F Ryder
5. The Eastern Chapels Tracery Project – Chris Tolan-Smith
6. Concerning the Service of the Church – Evidence in the Abbey’s Collections for Changes in Access and Worship – Hugh Dixon
7. A Seemly and Good Order: Hexham Abbey’s Collection of Prayer Books – Chris Simmons
8. Abbey Vestments – Neel Lever and Christine Seal
9. Would Wilfrid Recognize This? 3D Digital Modelling of Hexham Abbey – Louise Hampson & Geoff Arnott, Patrick Gibbs, Anthony Masinton.
Envoi by The Revd Canon Dr Dagmar Winter, Rector and Lecturer of Hexham; Bibliography; Index.
ObjProdOrganisationLighting Source UK Ltd, Milton Keynes
ObjProdDate2017
NotesAvailable from Hexham Abbey Gift Shop and from Amazon (even if “out of stock” because it’s “Print-on-Demand”): see URLs.
Dimensions152 × 229 × 9
PubDate10/07/2017
Paginationx + 100
EditionOccasional Publication No.14
PublisherHexham Local History Society
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNoteglossy card cover grey image on blue background of Hexham Abbey; glued
EditorChris Tolan-Smith & Peter Richmond
ISBN978-0-9527615-9-4
CurrentLocationIn storage
URLSee also: www.amazon.co.uk
See also: www.hexhamabbey.org.uk

ObjectNumberHEXAB5223.1Hover on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB6500
TitleFlavinus
ObjectNamebooklet | publication
Materialpaper
ContentDescriptionContents: 1 Sources of evidence; 2 The units; 3 Ala Petriana; 4 Standard equipment of horsemen and horses from the 1st–3rd century AD; 5 Roman tombstones and iconography; 6 Roman funerals; 7 Flavinus tombstone; 8 Beliefs; 9 Hexham before Wilfrid; 10 The crypt and its Roman stones; 11 Bibliography.
ObjProdDate2017
ObjectHistoryNoteProduced for the ‘Flavinus’ day in August 2017
Dimensions148 × 210
PubDate2017
Pagination28 inc. cover
Publishernone
PubPlacenone
BindingNoteColour illus. & cover
AuthorAnneke-Susan Hackenbroich
CurrentLocationIn storage

ObjectNumberHEXAB5229 Click on
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AssocObjNumberHEXAB9010.1 | HEXAB9289
TitleThe ‘Breeches’ Bible
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelTextThe ‘Breeches’ Bible
1611
This rare edition of the Geneva Bible was translated from the Hebrew and Greek by exiles in Geneva. It was important because, for the first time, the bible had text divided into numbered verses, which was extremely useful for preachers and readers alike.
It was popularly called the Breeches Bible because, whereas the Authorized Version says “sewed fig leaves together and made themselves aprons”, this edition says “they sewed figge tree leaves together and made themselves breeches” (Genesis, chapter 3, verse 7).
This copy was presented to Hexham Abbey in 1954 by Col. H L Swinburne; it had been in his family’s possession for 150 years. It recently underwent conservation work at the Durham County Archives.
Our grateful thanks are due to the Heritage Lottery Fund, the Church Buildings Council, and others for funding the new case and the delicate conservation work.
BREECHES BIBLE 1612
Note: Because of its rarity and fragile condition this Bible is displayed in a secure case in the north aisle of the Abbey church, where it can be inspected.
The Breeches Bible is a variant edition of the translation known as the Geneva Bible. It takes its name from the word used in Genesis 3:7 to describe the garments made out of fig leaves by Adam and Eve when they discovered the shame of nakedness. Most translations of the time used the word “aprons.” Perhaps the change reflects scholarly anxiety about the possibility of aprons blowing about in the wind! Today the most common translation is “loincloths.” A version using the word “underpants” would probably attract critical notice.
The Geneva Bible, as its name suggests, was produced in Geneva, which was then ruled as a republic and had become the de facto headquarters of 16th century Protestantism. During the reign of Queen Mary I of England (1553–58), a number of Protestant scholars fled there to escape persecution.
This version of the Bible is significant because, for the very first time, a mechanically printed, mass-produced Bible was made available directly to the general public which came with a variety of scriptural study guides and aids which included verse citations that allow the reader to cross-reference one verse with numerous relevant verses in the rest of the Bible, introductions to each book of the Bible that acted to summarize all of the material that each book would cover, maps, tables, woodcut illustrations and indices.
The first full edition of this Bible appeared in 1560, but it was not printed in England until 1575 (New Testament) and 1576 (complete Bible). It was enormously popular, and over 150 editions were issued; the last probably in 1644.
The annotations which are an important part of the Geneva Bible were Calvinist and Puritan in character, and as such they were disliked by the ruling pro-government Anglicans of the Church of England, as well as King James I, who commissioned the translation still known as the Authorized , or King James Version, in order to replace it.
The Abbey’s copy, presented in 1954 by Colonel H.L Swinburne, whose family had owned it for some 150 years, includes a number of interesting features which are the subject of current research.
CreditLineThis Bible was presented to Hexham Abbey by Col. H L Swinburne in January 1954. It had been in his family’s possession for 150 years.
ContentDescriptionTitle-page of Bible, followed by title-page and text of Book of Common Prayer, then text of Old Testament and Apocrypha, then title-page and text of New Testament; on the reverse of the NT title-page are written family births and deaths, commencing with William Darnell, b.1694, d.1741. After the NT: ‘THE WHOLE BOOKE OF PSALMES, Collected into English Meeter by Thomas Sternhold, Iohn Hopkins and others.’
ObjProdOrganisationImprinted at London by Robert Barker, Printer to the Kinges most excellent Majestie
ObjProdDate1611–1612
ObjectHistoryNoteThe bible, which dates to 1611, was re-backed in the 1990s, for which there is written documentation. The bible had seen at least two restoration events previous to this: the spine was dated to the early eighteenth century and the boards and marble endpapers to the late eighteenth century. There was some conservation work in 1994; see HEXAB9289.
Conservation work was carried out in the Conservation Studio at Durham County Record Office by the Archive Conservator Jennifer Halling Barnard. The bible was delivered to the studio by Tom Kelsey, Chairman of the Conservation Advisory Group at Hexham Abbey, on Monday 30th June, and collected by him on Monday 11th August, 2014.
Edition‘Geneva’
BindingNoteThe binding must be suitably supported in its various positions and the book cradle adjusted accordingly.
CurrentLocationIn storage

ObjectNumberHEXAB5233.1Hover on
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TitleTreasures of Hexham Abbey No.1 Painted Panels
ObjectNamebooklet | publication
ContentDescriptionLocation plan; 1 The Pulpitum; 2 Ogle Chantry; 3 Leschman Chantry; 4 Screens, etc. north side of Sanctuary; 5 St Etheldreda’s Chapel parclose screen; 6 Passion panels; 7 Triforium panels; 8 Pulpit. 26 colour photos.
ObjProdDate2018
DimensionsA5
PubDate2018
Pagination12
PublisherHexham Abbey Conservation Team
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNoteStapled A4 folded in half
AuthorChris Britton
EditorP Richmond, H Dixon
CurrentLocationIn storage

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TitleTreasures of Hexham Abbey No.2 Stained Glass
ObjectNamebooklet | publication
ContentDescriptionLocation plan; William Wailes; Clayton & Bell; J-B Capronnier; Hardman & Co; G J Baguley; Mayer & Co; Gateshead Glass Co; C E Kempe & Co; Henry Holiday; Henry Bosdet; Davidson & Walker; Atkinson Brothers; S M Scott & Hartley Wood; Alan Davis; 43 colour photos.
ObjProdDate2018
DimensionsA5
PubDateDec 2018
Pagination24
PublisherHexham Abbey Conservation Team
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNoteStapled A4 folded in half
AuthorChris Britton
EditorP Richmond, H Dixon
CurrentLocationIn storage

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TitleTreasures of Hexham Abbey No.3 Heraldry
ObjectNamebooklet | publication
ContentDescriptionLocation plan; Introduction; 1 The Royal Arms; 2 The Orders of Chivalry; 3 Funeral Hatchments; 4 Heraldic Glass; 5 Effigies and Monuments; 6 Ecclesiastical Heraldry; 7 Civic Heraldry; 8 Military Heraldry; 9 A Hidden Corner; 10 Outside Oddments; The Compiler’s Arms; Glossary of Heraldic Terms; Suggestions for Further Reading. 46 colour photos.
ObjProdDate2019
DimensionsA5
PubDateFeb 2019
Pagination24
PublisherHexham Abbey Conservation Team
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNoteStapled A4 folded in half
AuthorChris Simmons
EditorChris Britton, P Richmond, H Dixon
CurrentLocationIn storage

ObjectNumberHEXAB5502 Click on
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TitleBook of Common Prayer
ObjectNamebook | publication
ContentDescriptionB.C.P. with unusual additions of Act of Uniformity 1662, Canons of 1603 and metrical psalms and hymns of Tate and Brady.
Inside: a letter from the Bishop of Newcastle with a letter from the Archbishops of York & of Canterbury to all the clergy.
ObjectHistoryNoteThe plate inside the front cover records that it was “presented to Hexham Abbey Church by the Revd Henry Christopher Barker MA, Lecturer, 1862”.
Dimensions300 × 480 × 70
PubDate1838
PublisherCUP
PubPlaceCambridge
BindingNoteTooled black leather, gold edged pages
CurrentLocationVestry
ReferenceHAR: fn.7 p.64

ObjectNumberHEXAB5503 Click on
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TitleBook of Common Prayer
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelText1822
This massive volume must have rested on a suitably massive reading desk which, before the restoration of the nave in the early twentieth century, would have stood in the candle-lit gloom of the Abbey quire. Its large print would therefore have been essential for ease of reading. The cover is simply inscribed “Hexham Church 1831”. It has been well used. Many of the page corners have been repaired and damaged again by further use.
As well as all the usual BCP contents this copy contains the complete Constitutions and Canons Ecclesiastical (i.e Church Law) as they had been drawn up and agreed by the Convocation of the Province of Canterbury in 1603, under the authority of King James I.
ContentDescriptionBCP with 2 Acts of Uniformity, Psalms in metrical form of Tate and Brady and services for particular occasions: Gunpowder Treason, Martyrdom of Charles I, Restoration of Charles II, Accession of William IV
Dimensions290 × 485 × 50
PubDate1822
PublisherOUP
PubPlaceOxford
BindingNoteRed leather binding, gold tooling on cover, some repair. “Hexham Church 1831” on front cover.
CurrentLocationVestry
ReferenceHAR: fn.5 p.62

ObjectNumberHEXAB5505.1 Click on
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TitleBook of Common Prayer
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelText1796
These two identical copies are the oldest in the Abbey’s collection. It is possible that they were used by the Rector and the Lecturer, or possibly by the Rector and the Parish Clerk. One shows slightly more wear to the spine and binding than the other.
Printed as an appendix are Tate and Brady’s metrical versions of the Psalms, prefaced by the Order in Council of King Charles II dated 3rd December 1696 permitting their use “in all such Churches, Chapels and Congregations, as shall think fit to receive the same.”
ContentDescriptionwith metrical psalms and hymns
Dimensions220 × 270 × 25
PubDate1796
PublisherCUP
PubPlaceCambridge
BindingNoteLeather bound
CurrentLocationVestry
ReferenceHAR: fn.2 p.59

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TitleBook of Common Prayer
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelText1796
These two identical copies are the oldest in the Abbey’s collection. It is possible that they were used by the Rector and the Lecturer, or possibly by the Rector and the Parish Clerk. One shows slightly more wear to the spine and binding than the other.
Printed as an appendix are Tate and Brady’s metrical versions of the Psalms, prefaced by the Order in Council of King Charles II dated 3rd December 1696 permitting their use “in all such Churches, Chapels and Congregations, as shall think fit to receive the same.”
ContentDescriptionwith metrical psalms and hymns
Dimensions220 × 270 × 25
PubDate1796
PublisherCUP
PubPlaceCambridge
BindingNoteLeather bound. Cover marked & spine slightly damaged
CurrentLocationVestry
ReferenceHAR: fn.2 p.59

ObjectNumberHEXAB5507.2 Click on
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TitleHistory of his own time. Vol. 2
ObjectNamebook | publication
ContentDescriptionInscribed ‘Robt Green 1741’, ‘William Scott’, ‘Walter Scott’.
Contains alphabetical list of subscribers.
InscriptionThe original manuscript of both volumes of this history will be deposited in the Cotton library by J. Burnett
InscriptionDescriptionOn reverse of title page there is a hand-written inscription double outlined in red
NotesGilbert Burnet (1643–1715) was Bishop of Salisbury.
He was consecrated 31/03/1689 by a commission of bishops to whom Archbishop Sancroft had delegated his authority, declining personally to perform the office.
Dimensions250 × 360 × 65
PubDate1734
PublisherDowning and Woodfall
PubPlaceLondon
BindingNoteLeather bound, tooled spine & cover.
AuthorBishop Burnet
CurrentLocationVestry

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AssocObjNumberHEXAB1035 | HEXAB9023
TitleHeroes of the Battlefield
ObjectNamecard | ephemera
ContentDescriptionCard listing Hexham Soldiers and Sailors serving worldwide – August 1914 to July 1, 1917. Contains 107 names.
Dimensions285 × 445 × 5
PubDate1917
PubPlaceHexham
BindingNoteOnce framed
AuthorE S Savage
CurrentLocationVestry

ObjectNumberHEXAB5512 Click on
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TitleBible
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelTextKING JAMES (AUTHORIZED) BIBLE
1876
(HEXAB5512)
This Bible was given for use on Bagraw Reading Desk by John Stokoe Esquire in June 1878 (Flyleaf inscription.)
Printed in London in 1876, this is a copy of the Bible translation usually referred to as either the King James Version (KJV) or the Authorized Version (AV). The translation dates from 1611, and is the work of a group of 47 scholars from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge, commissioned for the task by King James I of England and VI of Scotland. It was never, strictly speaking “authorized”, but was from the outset described on the title page as being “appointed to be read in churches.”
By whatever name it is described, this is undoubtedly the most widely-known and quoted translation of the Bible in the English speaking world. “Am I my brother’s keeper?” “Sufficient unto the day…” “…and some fell on stony ground.”
This was not the earliest “authorized” translation of the Bible into English. The Great Bible of 1539, itself based on earlier translations, was the first, authorized by King Henry VIII to be read aloud in the services of the Church of England. The clergy were directed to provide “one book of the bible of the largest volume in English, and the same set up in some convenient place within the said church that ye have care of, whereas your parishioners may most commodiously resort to the same and read it.” Although called the Great Bible
because of its large size, it was also known as the Chained Bible, since it was chained to prevent removal from the church. It was this version that the KJV effectively superseded from 1611.
The reference in the dedication to “Bagraw Reading Desk” presumably refers to the stand on which the Bible would have been placed in the old chapel-of-ease at Lowgate, which was linked to the Abbey parish and served by the Abbey clergy. The chapel stands a few hundred yards from Bagraw farmhouse. Stokoe is a long established local family name.
Inside the Bible is an undated order for a Christmas service in Lowgate chapel. It is typed on the back of a sheet of notepaper headed “Old People’s Welfare Centre, Abbey Buildings, Hexham”.
ContentDescriptionHandwritten inscription on flyleaf
InscriptionBagraw Reading Desk
Presented by John Stokoe Esquire
1878
ObjProdOrganisationGeorge E Eyre & William Spottiswoode
ObjProdDate1876
ObjectHistoryNotePresented by John Stokoe Esq. 1878. Originaly at Bagraw then at St Mary Lowgate as the altar copy between 1894 and 2003 when St Mary closed.
Dimensions220 × 290 × 75
PubDate1876
PublisherBritish and Foreign Bible Society
PubPlaceLondon
BindingNoteBlack leather bound
CurrentLocationVestry

ObjectNumberHEXAB5514 Click on
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TitleBook of Common Prayer
ObjectNamebook | publication
LabelText1936
Inscribed on November 11th 1936 by the Revd J L C Farquhar, Rector of Hexham as having been given “In grateful memory of Hannah Benson Woodman, a loved and loving Mother and a Friend to all good causes.”
This book is of interest because it contains the only service in the entire history of the Book of Common Prayer which can never have been used: the Form of Prayer and Service authorized by King Edward VIII to be used yearly on 20th January to mark the anniversary of his accession. Only five days after Mr Farquhar wrote his inscription, the King told the Prime Minister, Stanley Baldwin of his desire to marry Mrs Simpson. The “abdication crisis” unfolded very rapidly, and Edward ceased to be King on 11th December, after less than a year on the throne.
ContentDescriptionIn memory of Hannah Benson Woodman 1936
ObjProdDate1936
Dimensions175 × 260 × 60
PubDate1936
PublisherCUP
PubPlaceCambridge
BindingNoteBlack leather. Cover marked with gold cross and “Hexham Abbey”. Spine marked “Common Prayer”
CurrentLocationVestry
ReferenceHAR: fn.11 p.66

ObjectNumberHEXAB5519 Click on
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TitleAltar Services (1662)
ObjectNamebook | publication
ContentDescriptionIncludes royal warrant by command of George VI dated 22/01/1937.
Inscription in red border on flyleaf signed by J V C Farquhar, Rector.
Inscription
S. Mary.
Lowgate
The gift of
Commander & Mrs. Duke.
Duke Willey.
Christmas 1939.
ObjectHistoryNoteThe gift of Commander and Mrs Duke. Duke Willey, Christmas 1939; originally at St Mary Lowgate (closed 2003).
Dimensions180 × 272 × 28
PubDate1937
PublisherEyre & Spottiswood
PubPlaceLondon
BindingNoteCover marked “S. Mary’s, Lowgate” in gold. “Altar Services” on spine.
Black leather is “pimply” over whole cover. What is this effect called?
CurrentLocationVestry